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Category Archive: Vintage

Jeronimo Fuentes vintage silver jewelry

Jeronimo Fuentes vintage silver jewelry

Traditional Mexican story, a man in a sombrero sitting near a cactus. Brooch circa 1960s. Sterling silver, guilloche enamel. Jeronimo Fuentes vintage silver jewelry

Jeronimo Fuentes vintage silver jewelry
The renowned Taxco silversmith Jerónimo Fuentes created unique artistic silver jewellery with the use of guilloche enamel in the 1950s-70s. Fuentes was a pupil of American-born silver designer and artist William Spratling (1900-1967), having received his knowledge at the famous studio Taller de las Delicias. After completing his studies, he began his career at the Margot de Taxco studio, where he became its lead master (in 1952). Thanks to Margot van Voorhies Carr (1896-1985), the founder of the workshop, he mastered the “language of enamel on silver”, bringing to life any of Margot’s jewelry fantasies. However, in 1961, Fuentes opened his own workshop, where he began to make funny silver jewelry with multicolored enamel. After the closure of her studio in 1974, Margot allowed Fuentes to use her designs, but the artist chose to go his own way.
Traditionally, the markings on his products include HECHO EN MEXICO, STERLING, Silhouette-eagle and stylized JF, for Jeronimo Fuentes.
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Lucien Piccard vintage costume jewelry

Lucien Piccard vintage costume jewelry

Art Deco Lady’s face pendant. 14 K Gold plated, rhinestones. 5.5 cm. 1970s. Lucien Piccard vintage costume jewelry

Lucien Piccard vintage costume jewelry
The history of renowned timepiece maker Lucien Piccard spans nearly one hundred years, founded in Switzerland in 1923. In addition to watches, eyewear and perfumes, clothing and footwear, leather goods and gifts, the company made exquisite costume jewelry. Noteworthy, Lucien Piccard is not the name of any particular living individual.
It was Manhattan, New York based jeweler Abraham Blumstein (1902-1984) who owned the trademark. Chairman of the Lucien Piccard company in New York since 1931, Abraham Blumstein registered “Lucien Piccard Original” jewelry trademark in 1953. Blumstein retired in 1968. However, his company Lucien Piccard Original ceased to exist in 1997.
Also, Lucien Piccard company registered some more trademarks on production of costume jewelry – in 1962, Giltron (1964 – 1985), in 1969 and in 2001 – trademark owned by A. G. Inc.
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Natty Creations vintage costume jewelry

Natty Creations vintage costume jewelry

Floral design scarf holder. 1940s. Textured brass, multicolor art glass. 1940s. Natty Creations vintage costume jewelry

Natty Creations vintage costume jewelry
The history of Nat Levy Co., a jewelry company located at 302 Fifth Avenue, spans no more than three decades. Its founder, Nathan Levy, registered his jewelry trademark Natty Creations in the mid-1930s. Traditionally, the designer created dress accessories such as floral dress clips and Art Deco scarf holders. In the manufacture of jewelry, the company’s craftsmen used brass, alloys of gold and silver tone, freshwater and faux pearls. The markings on the back of each item included “Natty Creations” and a patent number. Thanks to this number, connoisseurs of vintage jewelry and just lovers of vintage jewelry can determine the date of manufacture of the product.
Noteworthy, Nathan Levy registered another jewelry trademark “Natalie Originals” in New York, New York in 1943. According to Business Notes, published in the New York Times on June 11, 1937, Nat Levy Co. collaborated with jewelry designers Urie F. Mandle and Harry Heiferman. As a result, the company name was changed to Nat Levy – Urie Mandle Corporation.
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Ikuo Ichimori vintage costume jewelry

Ikuo Ichimori vintage costume jewelry

Abstract design brooch. Silver tone metal alloy, glass cabochons. 5 cm. 1980s. Ikuo Ichimori vintage costume jewelry

Ikuo Ichimori vintage costume jewelry
The award winning jewelry designer Ikuo turns 75 on September 1, 1921. Born in Osaka, Japan, he was trained as an interior designer in Tokyo. The 24-year-old designer came to Paris and soon became famous for his unique costume jewelry designs, collaborating with renowned fashion houses. Karl Lagerfeld once said that “If I had the subtlety of jewelry making like Ikuo, I would be William Shakespeare in fashion … that’s why I’m just Oscar Wilde.”
Ikuo opened his Parisian costume jewelry boutique at 11 Rue des Grands Augustins in 1977 (and in 1990s in Tokio). Noteworthy, the same year, his friend, Japanese artist Shige Amano, designed the logo for his company. The very next year, Ikuo received an award for the designer necklace and ring presented at the International Pearl Design Contest. Also, the World Gold Council awarded the designer with the Grand Prix. The designer’s works adorn many galleries, museums and private collections.
Every work of this Japanese designer shows him as a talented artist.
In September 2016, Ikuo wrote on his Facebook page that after almost 40 years of operating his shop, he closes it with an exhibition of paintings by artist Shige Amano.

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Signed Vero vintage costume jewelry

Signed Vero vintage costume jewelry

Mother cat with a kitten pin brooch. Gold and silver tone metal alloy, rhinestones. 1970s. Signed Vero vintage costume jewelry

Signed Vero vintage costume jewelry
The history of the company that made these whimsical pins remains a complete mystery. In fact, any information about the trademark, registered patents, the company’s owners, or any traces are unavailable. However, some searches lead to one place – Vero Beach, Florida. In the 1960s, there were several jewelry workshops and stores of the same name, where dynasties of famous jewelers worked. For example, DuBose & Sons – five generations of jewelers. Noteworthy, the first Vero store opened in 1912, and the area became known as Vero Beach only in 1925. Meanwhile, DuBose was one of the many other jewelry workshops which also operated in Vero Beach.
The distinctive marking on the back of each item includes “Vero” in capital letters with a copyright sign in a rectangular frame. Produced in the 1960-80s, these unique pins have their own characteristics, which make them quite recognizable.
Traditionally, the craftsmen of this company used metal alloys of gold and silver tones, multi-colored enamels and a minimum of rhinestones. The designs include fun figurative animal pins and holiday decorations. Among them, in particular, are Christmas, Easter decorations, pins for Halloween and other holidays.
Undoubtedly, any Vero brooch would make a great gift or a valuable addition to your vintage jewelry collection.
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Signed BED vintage costume jewelry

Signed BED vintage costume jewelry

Flower three-dimensional brooch. Gold tone metal, copper mesh, Aurora Borealis rhinestones. 6.5 cm. 1950s. Signed BED vintage costume jewelry

Signed Bed vintage costume jewelry
Traditionally, the designs of these vintage brooches and earrings incorporate a floral motif and the distinctive gold or silver-tone metal mesh used for the petals of these flowers. The double row of petals gives them more volume and a three-dimensional appearance. Aurora borealis rhinestones decorate the center of the flower. Also, many designs of these handcrafted pieces include multi-colored enamel. In general, these exquisite decorations are closer to artisan and even sculptural work.
Unfortunately, there is practically no information about an American jewelry company that produced stylish costume jewelry for a short time, around the 1950 – 1960s. They marking on the back includes capital letters BED with the copyright sign.
Noteworthy, the B.E.D. trademark for the production of brooches, pins, figurines, statues, and other products, was registered in June 2004 and existed for three years. The name of the employee who registered this trademark is Ellen J. Perkins. However, it is unknown if it has anything to do with vintage jewelry trademark B.E.D.

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Erstwilder vintage style costume jewelry

Erstwilder vintage style costume jewelry

Musical cats collection. Ripple resins. 6.4 cm. 2010s. Erstwilder vintage style costume jewelry

Erstwilder vintage style costume jewelry
The plastic jewelry of based in Melbourne Australian company resembles retro celluloid pins popular in the 1930s, or vintage Bakelite brooches by French designer Lea Stein of the 1960s. This is probably why, very often the owners of these brooches mistakenly indicate the years of manufacture 1980-1990s and materials – bakelite or lucite. Actually, these high quality resin brooches, which design ranges from Michael Jackson-like cats to Gatsby girls, are not more than a decade.
According to the company’s history, “Erstwilder” began its activity in 2011. And it was Louisa Camille, an artist, vintage lover, animal admirer, and fashion designer who first created the sketches of future pins. According to her designs, she drew inspiration from the Art Deco era and the animal world.
Traditionally, the few craftsmen of this company use layered resin, metal alloys, hard enamel, hand-painting each piece, which makes this piece unique. Noteworthy, there are over 500 different designs and each is produced in limited quantities.

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