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Category Archive: Vintage

Coppola e Toppo vintage jewellery masterpieces

Coppola e Toppo vintage jewellery masterpieces

Vintage poster “Fashion Jewels’. Coppola e Toppo vintage jewellery masterpieces

Coppola e Toppo vintage jewellery masterpieces
Originally, talented designers brother and sister Bruno Coppola and Lyda Toppo created the Coppola e Toppo company in the late 1940s in Milan, Italy. Interestingly, they produced their early works under the name of their favorite dog Mickey. Meanwhile, Parisian fashion houses Dior and Balenciaga used the company’s jewelry work in model shows and retail sales. This, of course, ensured the continued success of Coppola e Toppo in the next decade. In addition, the power of attorney received from Elsa Shiaparelli for the production of an artificial coral line called “Bijou Voyagers” made it possible for designers to show high professionalism. And large orders from such Italian couturiers as Gucci and Valentino, allowed to increase the number of works produced by the company under its own brand: “Made in Italy” Coppola e Toppo”.
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Stanley Hagler Jewelry designer Ian St. Gielar

Stanley Hagler Jewelry designer Ian St. Gielar

Red coral starfish brooch. Stanley Hagler Jewelry designer Ian St. Gielar

Stanley Hagler Jewelry designer Ian St. Gielar
Most jewelry experts associate Hagler’s company with the names of three great designers. In particular, Stanley Hagler himself (since the 1950s), Mark Mercy (since 1979) and Ian St. Gielar (since 1989). In 1983 Stanley Hagler moved his company to Florida and Mark Mercy followed with him. And in 1989, the talented designer Ian St. Gielar joined them and stayed with them until 1993. Meanwhile, Stanley Hagler himself continued to create until 1994, but was forced to retire for health reasons. Up until the death of Hagler in 1996, it was Ian St. Gielar who was engaged in design. Settled in Florida, jewelry designer Ian St. Gielar worked as the chief designer at Stanley Hagler until his death in 1996. He then founded his own company and produced jewelry both under his own name and under the trademark “Stanley Hagler NY.”
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H. Pomerantz Co NY vintage costume jewellery

H. Pomerantz Co NY vintage costume jewellery

Gold and Faux Pearl Figural Insect Brooch. H. Pomerantz Co NY vintage costume jewellery

H. Pomerantz Co NY vintage costume jewellery

As you know, vintage ornaments are those that are more than 20 years old, but usually not yet 80. And if older, it is already antiques. Along with the beautiful design of the jewelry, the most valuable are those that were produced in the middle of the 20th century and ceased to exist several decades ago. It is these decorations that are most desired for collectors and fans of vintage jewelry. In fact, to such rarities the products of the American company H.Pomerantz & Co. New York belong. All ornaments, mostly brooches, labeled “H. Pomerantz & Co. N.Y.,” “H. Pomerantz Inc. N.Y.,” “H. Pomerantz Co.” and “H. Pomerantz” – are the rarest to date. The brand H. Pomerantz Co, NY was in business between 1880 and 1940. Unfortunately, the company ceased to exist in the 1960s.
Noteworthy, the auction value for some of the works of this jewelry company now already reaches more than thousand dollars !!! Undoubtedly, the brooch studded with clear rhinestones, and in particular, H. Pomerantz Co is a luxurious gift for a woman of any age with the most demanding taste. Striking in design beautiful costume jewelry by the brand can be a perfect choice for your fall, winter and spring wardrobe.

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Arnold Isaacs Scaasi costume jewellery

Arnold Isaacs Scaasi costume jewellery

Gold plated emerald green rhinestone cocktail ring. Arnold Isaacs Scaasi costume jewellery

Arnold Isaacs Scaasi costume jewellery
Scaasi, in fact, is the inverted name of a Canadian fashion designer Arnold Isaacs (May 8, 1930 – August 3, 2015).
Born in 1930, the future fashion and jewelry designer Arnold Scaasi grew up in a furrier’s family. Of course, the boy often helped his father in his workshop. However, Arnold decided to become a designer after his trip to Australia to his aunt, who was a great fashionista.
Arnold Isaacs graduated from the School of Design in his native Montreal, and then enrolled in the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture (Syndicate of High Fashion) in Paris. Then he worked at Paquin House, and finally moved to New York, at the invitation of the studio of the legendary designer Charles James.
Noteworthy, his clients were ex-first ladies Mami Eisenhower, Barbara Bush, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush, Ivanka Trump, Princess Yasmine Aga Khan, and Baroness Wendy De Vere Austin. And of course, such actresses as Barbara Streisand, Elizabeth Taylor, Catherine Deneuve and Joan Crawford. To the admirers of his talent, Arnold dedicated the book “Women I Have Dressed (and Undressed!)” . According to the designer, clothes with jewelry decorations look more interesting and more interesting to wear.
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Masterpieces of Alice Caviness Costume Jewelry

Masterpieces of Alice Caviness Costume Jewelry

Brooch – textured metal of gold tone, artificial rubies. 1960’s. Masterpieces of Alice Caviness Costume Jewelry

Masterpieces of Alice Caviness Costume Jewelry
American jewelry designer Alice Caviness started making jewelry right after the Second World War. Based in Long Island, New York, her company continued production after her death in 1983. Meanwhile, her jewelry is very diverse: necklaces, earrings, brooches, cameos, motifs of fruits and animal figurines. For the production of these exquisite decorations used high-quality materials, in particular crystals of unusual color. Labeled “Alice Caviness”, most of them are rare and very popular among collectors.
In fact, on the design and production of these masterpieces of costume jewellery worked Caviness herself and Millie Petronzio who worked for Caviness until 1982. However, at that time Millie Petronzio became head designer for Miriam Haskell. Alice Caviness jewelry is always distinctive and unusual.
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MGM Queen jewellery lover Norma Shearer

MGM Queen jewellery lover Norma Shearer

Marie Antoinette played by MGM Queen, jewellery lover Norma Shearer

MGM Queen jewellery lover Norma Shearer
“An adventure can become a dark spot or a bright adornment in the picture of life. It all depends on what woman experienced it, “– American-Canadian actress, winner of the Oscar for the film The Divorcee Norma Shearer.

Noteworthy, Hollywood diva Norma Shearer loved and wore lots of jewellery, both in life and in films. In particular, in the Collection of Academy Award winning actress Norma Shearer was a gold, platinum and diamond necklace (est. $150/200,000). Retailed by famed Hollywood jeweler Flato, the necklace is a wonderful example of Flato at his best and most dramatic days. In fact, Norma Shearer bought it around 1941 when both she and the designer were in their heyday. Created by Flato’s talented designer George Headley as a cascade of flowers, diamond-set leaves and a bow, this jewel decorated a 1941 edition of Vogue magazine.
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Art Nouveau style jeweler Lucien Gaillard

Art Nouveau style jeweler Lucien Gaillard

Stunning Dragonflies Comb for hair – diamonds, emeralds, citrine, enamel. 1904. Art Nouveau style jeweler Lucien Gaillard

Art Nouveau style jeweler Lucien Gaillard

One of the most distinguished jewelers of his time, Lucien Gaillard (1861 – 1942) was a jeweler in the third generation, working in Art Nouveau style. The skill of the jeweler with the use of a minimum of funds and a subtle sense of material are worthy of admiration. Besides, he became known for his work with exotic materials, such as horn, and unsurpassed art with the use of enamels. In particular, refined brooches, hairpins, combs, rings, and perfume bottles strike with their beauty and sophisticated work. His original products were laconic and modest.
Meanwhile, in the late 60-ies of the 19th century, a general fascination with Japanese art began in Paris. Thus, invited Japanese masters gave lectures on the art of the East and conducted master classes. Accordingly, on the wave of this interest in the art of jewelry began to appear “Japanese motifs.”
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