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Category Archive: Vintage

Signed AS vintage costume jewelry

Signed AS vintage costume jewelry

Glitter enamel rhinestones gold tone Christmas tree brooch. Signed AS vintage costume jewelry

Signed AS vintage costume jewelry (1974-1998)
Many traditional costume jewelry companies launched additional holiday jewelry lines or trademarks during the 1970-80s, with Christmas tree pins being a big seller. The trend continued into the early 1990s.
Searching for the history of the jewelry brand “A.S.” took a lot of time and effort, but it is worth it. Terrific and beautiful holiday brooches with traditional motifs – Christmas trees, snowmen, balls, Santa Clauses, deer, bells, snowflakes and wreaths traditionally attract vintage jewelry collectors.
A jewelry workshop for the production of costume jewelry, and in particular with a Christmas and Halloween theme, existed in California from 1974 until late 1990s. A small team of jewelers handcrafted Christmas pins using gold and silver tone metal alloys, pewter, glitter and multicolor enamels, rhinestones and Aurora Borealis crystals.
About the maker’s mark. There is a slight confusion with the marking. Some mistakenly read it as “ASO”. Actually, the marking on oval cartouche includes the initials “A.S.” and a copyright sign, or a stylized notation for the word “company”. Noteworthy, some Christmas pins were sold on holiday cards and with the designation of the place of manufacture – “Made in CA”.
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Signed BDA vintage costume jewelry

Signed BDA vintage costume jewelry

Carved carnelian cameo 10 K gold pendant. 1950s. Signed BDA vintage costume jewelry

Signed BDA vintage costume jewelry (1943-1986)
The history of the BDA jewelry brand began in Providence, Rhode Island, founded by three partners in 1943. Among them, in particular, Frank Rhodes Budlong (1889-1956), Edgar Milton Docherty (born August 8, 1883, Canada), and George A. Armstrong (b. in Cranston, RI).
Founded in 1905, Budlong, Docherty & Armstrong, Inc. was formerly known as William C. Greene Co., the oldest jewelry firm in Providence, founded in 1849 by William C. Greene.
Renamed Budlong, Docherty & Armstrong Inc. in 1905, the company continued the glorious traditions of its predecessor.
BDA President Frank Rhodes Budlong (born July 22, 1889 in Cranston) was a hereditary jeweler whose father, Robert, owned the S.K. Merrill in Providence. After graduating from college, Frank began his career as a gem dealer for H. Nordlinger’s Sons. In 1905, he joined his father’s business as New York office manager of S.K. Merrill. Aged 26 he became the president of Budlong, Docherty & Armstrong, Inc., and Edgar Milton Docherty became the company’s secretary and treasurer.
Extremely rare and highly collectible, BDA classic designs most often include cameo brooches, pendants and rings made of handcarved carnelian or shell. The company’s craftsmen made high quality pieces with the use of 10 K gold, silver, pewter, cultured pearls, natural gems, as well as precious stones – sapphire, opals and emeralds.
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Ed Wiener modernist silver jewelry

Ed Wiener modernist silver jewelry

Inspired by American modern dancer and choreographer Martha Graham (May 11, 1894 – April 1, 1991) sterling silver brooch. 1950s. Ed Wiener modernist silver jewelry

Ed Wiener modernist silver jewelry
A self-taught jeweler, Ed Wiener (1918-1991) became one of the most famous modernist jewelry artists of his day, with a great understanding of form, line and color. According to Wiener himself, his designs from the late 1940s and 50s could be compared to jazz improvisation.
Born in New York in 1918, he worked in his father’s butcher’s shop before the war, then in a radio assembly shop, where he discovered his aptitude for manual labor.
The designer married like-minded woman Doris in 1944. He and his wife studied crafts at Columbia University for three months. Noteworthy, it was there that they made pins with the names and initials of their friends from twisted wire. The pins were so good that Ed and Doris immediately sold them.
In July 1945 they went to Provincetown, where in the summer of 1946 they opened a small shop and sold Mexican jewelry, bags, belts, as well as their own creations. The designer learned a lot from the artists who frequented his shop. They made him feel like he was doing something important.
Wiener admired the work of Calder and Georg Jensen, which disregarded the traditions of jewelry. He also admired the sculptural forms of Picasso, which he easily embodied into silver jewelry.
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The Icing vintage costume jewelry

The Icing vintage costume jewelry

Sun-face gold plated brooch with rhinestones. 7 cm. 1990s. The Icing vintage costume jewelry

The Icing vintage costume jewelry
The history of The Icing jewelry brand began almost 36 years ago in Wilmington, Delaware. Founded in 1987, The Icing Inc. (alternatively known as The Icing of Delaware) changed owners and location in 1994. In 1994 The Icing Inc. was registered in Illinois as a retail store providing fashion clothing and accessories for women.
Owned by Claire’s Boutiques, Inc. (in operation since 1956), the company achieved great success and expanded its business. Today, Icing is a global brand with hundreds of accessories and jewelry stores in the US and around the world.
Noteworthy, made in the 1980s and 90s and hallmarked with the stylized word “The Icing”, costume jewelry by this brand is rare and collectible.
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Gil d Agena vintage costume jewelry

Gil d Agena vintage costume jewelry

Textured gold tone swirl design brooch. 6.5 cm. 1980s. Gil d Agena vintage costume jewelry

Gil d Agena vintage costume jewelry (1985-2004)
The history of the Gil d’Agéna jewelry brand began in 1985 in Toul, a suburb of Meurthe-et-Moselle in northeastern France. A small team of jewelers handcrafted high-quality bracelets, brooches, necklaces, pendants and earrings in modernist, classic and haute couture styles. Traditionally, craftsmen used bronze, gilding and silvering, as well as rhinestones, mother-of-pearl, resin and art glass imitating natural stones.
The markings on the oval cartouche included the full name of the brand Gil d’Agéna France and two letters GA in an oval. Also, some jewelry was sold with an attached foil tag with the brand’s logo. Incorporated in January 1985, Gil d’Agena Ltd. ceased to exist in June 2004.
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George Steere Art Nouveau Jewelry

George Steere Art Nouveau Jewelry

Native American motif gilt brass and stone brooch. Early 20th century. George Steere Art Nouveau Jewelry

George Steere Art Nouveau Jewelry
Between 1890 and 1910, the Art Nouveau movement flourished throughout Europe and America, profoundly influencing many forms of art—posters, furniture, architecture, ceramics and jewelry. Among the most notable Art Nouveau’s jewelry designers of the time was George Nathaniel Steere.
Based in Pawtucket, Providence County, Rhode Island, George N. Steere Co. produced exquisite creations of timeless appeal. The design included stylized Egyptian, floral and animal forms with mythological dragons, lizards, bats and birds “holding up stones”. The designer signed his earlier jewelry items with stamp GS, and later GNS, which stands for George Nathaniel Steere.
Noteworthy, George Steere was the treasurer of the George N. Steere Co., while Frank T. Barton was the president of the firm.
According to the Jewelers’ Circular Weekly 1900, the firm had Steere’s Specialty Shop, located at 381 Main St., Pawtucket. The store offered high grade jewelry novelties, hatpins and similar articles. Special music, flowers, souvenirs and exquisite decorations attracted large crowds to the store. In addition, George Steere was erecting a new factory building on Commercial St., Pawtucket, the land, which Charles G. Bloomer leased to him for 10 years at $50 per year.
George N. Steere sold his company in the 1910s. Today, his jewelry is highly collectible.
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Signed ROM vintage costume jewelry

Signed ROM vintage costume jewelry

X-shaped bow brooch. Gold tone, rhinestones. 1980s. Signed ROM vintage costume jewelry

Signed ROM vintage costume jewelry (1976-1999)
The history of the jewelry brand ROM, founded by the Royal Ontario Museum, lasted a little over two decades, from 1976 to 1999. The Canadian museum, like most of the major museums in the world, produced replicas of art objects stored in the museum’s funds. In particular, paintings, sculptures, home decor items, silverware and jewelry. Registered in 1976, the trademark for the production of printed materials, decor and jewelry, “ROM” is no longer active. The brand’s logo included the word “ROM” with a crown on top.
In addition, the eponymous brand for the production of brooches, pendants, buckles, bracelets, necklaces, cufflinks and medallions was registered in the United States in 1993. This jewelry trademark ceased to exist in 1999.
Noteworthy, the markings on jewelry made in Canada and the United States are different. So, Canadian marking includes the word ROM with a crown on top and a copyright sign, and those made in the USA have the word ROM without a crown and a copyright sign. Exquisite jewelry, meticulously handcrafted from high quality materials, is a collector’s rarity today. There is no doubt that the purchase of a brooch or pendant marked ROM is a great success and happy acquisition for collectors of vintage jewelry.
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