Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Sutton Hoo vintage costume jewelry

Sutton Hoo vintage costume jewelry

Nutcracker gold plated brooch pin. 8.5 cm. 1992. Sutton Hoo vintage costume jewelry

Sutton Hoo vintage costume jewelry
The history of the American jewelry brand “Sutton Hoo” spans three decades, from 1975 to 2002. Its founder – Katharine Carlton Ridge, born December 31, 1946 in Louisville. She studied art and teaching in Holy Spirit School and Sacred Heart Academy. Also, she graduated from Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia in 1968. Beautiful woman and talented artist, she founded her own jewelry brand Sutton Hoo in 1975.
Traditionally, she used 24-carat gold-plated jewelry alloy, artificial pearls and art glass to create her brooches, earrings and pendants. The markings on the back side include the initials “SH” with the copyright sign and the year the product was created.
Katharine Carlton Ridge died 6 Oct 2015 at the age of 68 in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA.
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Denton vintage costume jewelry

Denton vintage costume jewelry

Flower brooch. Brass, porcelain. 1940s. Denton vintage costume jewelry

Denton vintage costume jewelry
English antique bone china flower brooch carries the charm of the past and past eras. In Victorian England and Europe, many flowers had deep symbolic meaning. Such spectacular jewelry with precise detailing, painted and created by hand, is individual and unique. Undoubtedly, such brooch can be an exclusive gift or a worthy part of a vintage jewelry collection.
Traditionally, many English companies, such as Cara China, Aynsley Fine Bone, Coalport China Co, Crown Staffordshire China Co, Bone China Crafts Co, Paragon China Co, and Denton China Co produced jewelry in addition to china tableware.
The history of the British porcelain company Denton China began immediately after the end of the Second World War, in 1945. Initially, it was a family business of D M Lawson and Herbert Lawson, a former decorator and pottery wholesaler from Staffordshire. After his death in 1949, D. M. Lawson continued the business and worked until 1968. Previously Denton China mainly made bone china “fantasies” – flower arrangements, birds, brooches, earrings, and wicker baskets.
Noteworthy, in December 1968, a large English porcelain company John Aynsley & Sons Ltd. bought Denton and re-labeled its products to Aynsley.
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Ward Brothers vintage costume jewelry

Ward Brothers vintage costume jewelry

Symbolic thistle flower brooch. Sterling silver, art glass. 1960s. Ward Brothers vintage costume jewelry

Ward Brothers vintage costume jewelry

The history of the Scottish jewelry brand “Ward Brothers” began in the late 19th century in Glasgow. Handcrafted from sterling silver in Celtic, Victorian and Scottish style, the pieces had a symbolic meaning. For example, the Lucky Heather and Horseshoe designs were worn to attract good luck and success. Another traditional design is the thistle, an element of the Scottish coat of arms, symbolizing tenacity, tenacity, and resistance. According to belief, a thistle ornament is a powerful talisman that protects a person from damage and the evil eye.
Made with great craftsmanship, the company’s jewelry became very popular, and as a result, the company expanded its business. So, jewelry production began in Edinburgh and then in Birmingham. Traditionally, the craftsmen of this brand made jewelry from sterling silver, as well as using gold plating. Also, they used both natural stones – Scottish agate, and glass imitations of ruby, amethyst, zirconium and garnet.
Noteworthy, the markings on the back of the items differ, according to the year and place of production of the jewelry. In particular, the initials WBS, also the anchor mark of Birmingham, followed by the lion, and the year; the purity of gold or silver; Chester 1921 (for Ward Brothers); thistle with towers and letter B. The company ceased to exist in the 1970s and became the property of another British brand that still specializes in Celtic, Irish and Scottish style jewelry.
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Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Avant-garde design 925 sterling silver brooch. 4.2 cm. 1960s. Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry
The history of the German jewelry brand “Andreas Daub” began about 150 years ago in the jewelry capital of Germany, the city of Pforzheim. The young jeweler Andreas Daub founded his family business in 1872, which has worked for five generations. Already at the beginning of the 20th century, the company became one of the leading companies in the German jewelry industry and one of the leading jewelry companies in Europe. Kurt Daub, the fifth generation jeweler, leads the company today.
The company produces premium, avant-garde, Victorian and Art Nouveau jewelry. Traditionally, jewelry markings include the initials A * D, as well as the purity of the metal. Noteworthy, the “Amerikaner” stamp is guaranteed to indicate the presence of gold in the product. Along with gold and copper, the company’s jewelers used sterling silver and natural stones such as corals, amethysts and even diamonds. Also, faux pearls, and glass cabochons imitating precious stones. High quality hand-made vintage jewelry hallmarked “Andreas Daub” is rare and highly collectible now.

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Elee vintage costume jewelry

Elee vintage costume jewelry

Sun drop dangle clip-on-earrings. Gold plated metal alloy, glass beads. 1980s. Elee vintage costume jewelry

Elee vintage costume jewelry
Dallas, Texas based “Elee Designs, Inc.” jewelry company was in business for a few years, from 11 October 1989 to 13 February 2004. Headed by Elaine Rutchik (b. 1938), director and president of the company, jewelers made high-quality, spectacular and large statement pieces. Traditionally made of rich 24 K gold plated metal, it was a series of long clip-on earrings or button shaped clips of bold, geometric and Art Deco design. Also, the craftsmen used enamel, rhinestones, glass beads, art glass, and faux pearls.
The marking on the back side of each piece includes the written word “Elee” on oval base.
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Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Art Nouveau Griffin Dragon pin. 14k Gold, pearl, ruby. Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Carter Gough antique costume jewelry
Born on January 17, 1817 in Newark, New Jersey, Aaron Carter was the founder of the jewelry company later known as “Carter, Gough & Co”. Aged 15, he studied jewelry for 6 years at local goldsmiths Taylor and Baldwin. After completing his studies in 1938, he began working as an apprentice at Newark jewelry factory, and from 1941 he started an independent business, in partnership with other jewelers. In particular, A. Pennington and Michael Doremus (1841-1844), and John R. Pierson (1848-1856). Accordingly, with the change of partners, the name of his company also changed – Carter & Doremus, Carter & Pierson; Carter, Howkins & Uodd; Carter, Howkins & Sloan. In 1876 Aaron’s eldest son William joined his business, when the company’s name was Carter, Howkins & Sloan.
Aaron Carter died on 31 Jan 1902 in Orange NJ. His fifty-three-year-old son William Tuttle Carter (born 28 September 1849) took over the company, which in 1915 changed its name to Carter, Gough & Co.
The company produced handcrafted jewelry in Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles. They used gold plating, enamel, pearls, amethyst and other stones to create cufflinks, bar brooches, circle pins, charms and pendants. Traditionally, they marked their pieces with a “C” inside an arrowhead. Lovers and collectors of vintage and antique jewelry appreciate the company’s work for its high quality and exquisite design.
Unfortunately, there is no exact date for the closure of the company or the date of William’s death.
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Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma

Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)

Kachina pendant. 1970s. Sterling silver, mixed metals. Work by Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)

Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)
Third Mesa, Arizona based goldsmith Charles Loloma stood firmly in the tradition of contemporary American gold smithing. He studied ceramics at the School for American Craftsmen at Alfred University in upstate New York, but moved into jewelry making in the 1950s. For more than twenty years he traveled the world both to teach and to study. True to his original vision, Loloma used to say “I could appreciate what was done in Egypt, but when I got home, I did my own designs”.
For a thousand years, Loloma and his ancestors have lived in the Hopi village. A member of the Badger Clan of the Hopi Nation, Loloma’s distinctive Native American style springs from the combination of artistry, materials, and imagination. Jewelry pieces created by the artist is the essence of the Hopi in Loloma, the closeness with the land, the connection with his tribe and his traditions.
Traditionally, Loloma used gold, sterling silver, turquoise, coral, ironwood, and ivory, lapis and other natural stones. He artfully signed his pieces “Loloma”. The jeweler has created truly timeless museum worth designs, which are highly collectible now.
Loloma died in 1991 at the age of 70.
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