Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Toshikane Japan porcelain costume jewelry

Toshikane Japan porcelain costume jewelry

Cufflinks. Golden pagoda against Mount Fuji and cherry blossoms. Sterling silver, handpainted porcelain. 1950s. Toshikane Japan porcelain costume jewelry

Toshikane Japan porcelain costume jewelry
Collectible large porcelain cufflinks featuring a golden pagoda against a backdrop of Mount Fuji and cherry blossoms. Hand-painted on three-dimensional porcelain plates. Fantastic detailing and amazing colors – during the production process, the porcelain was subjected to technological firing up to 5-9 times!
The brand was founded in Tokyo in 1943 on a wave of European fashion jewelry making its way into Japan. It all started with porcelain buttons, which became fashionable to decorate traditional clothes, then cufflinks, tie clips, bracelets, clips, brooches, and souvenir spoons … For a laconic base, they used mainly high-grade silver, or jewelry alloy. But, the main thing in any Toshikane decoration is porcelain inserts with volumetric (3D) images.
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Frederick Mosell vintage costume jewelry

Daisy brooch from the collection 'Summer'. Czech beads, faceted beads, swarovski crystals, Japanese beads, crystal ribbon, strass chain. 7cmFrederick Mosell vintage costume jewelry

A night at the opera. A couple in a theater stall brooch. Book piece. 1940s. Gold tone metal, enamel, rhinestones. Frederick Mosell vintage costume jewelry

Frederick Mosell vintage costume jewelry
The history of the American jewelry brand Mosell began in 1940, when the French emigrant Frederick Mosell came to New York. Founding Frederick Mosell Jewelry Co. NY, he began producing costume jewelry in exquisite designs. Handcrafted, especially interesting are his plot brooches. These brooches, unlike all the others, in addition to aesthetic pleasure, carry some other emotional message. They create a special mood and become more interesting as a decoration. Basically, these story brooches date from the 1940s – 1950s. In the 1960s, there are already much less of them, due to the influence of time and fashion.
Catwalk and the so-called Egyptian revival style replaced plot decorations. Handmade in limited numbers, large gold-plated necklaces, brooches and earrings with large crystals and cabochons were suitable for wearing with an evening dress.
Also, animal and plant designs were very popular – birds, insects, starfish, ferns, leaves, etc.
Rare in the vintage jewelry market, Mosell jewelry, referenced in jewelry guides, is collectible. After four decades of successful work, Mosell ceased to exist in 1980.
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Ben-Amun vintage fashion jewelry

Ben-Amun vintage fashion jewelry

Crystal ball gold tone earrings. Ben-Amun vintage fashion jewelry

Ben-Amun vintage fashion jewelry
Egyptian by birth, Isaac Manevitz founded Ben-Amun jewelry company in the early 1980s. The name of the company comes from the name of his eldest son Ben and the last four letters of the name of the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun. His wife Regina Manevitz has co-owned Ben-Amun for 40 years and serves as the designer’s muse.
All Ben-Amun products are handcrafted in a factory located in New York’s iconic Manhattan area. The cost of any piece of jewelry from Ben-Amun starts at $ 150, and this is not surprising, its jewelry is a work of art that you can wear. Isaac has a lot to be proud of, as his clients included such style icons as Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Kate Moss, Blake Lively and Rihanna. In addition, Ben-Amun jewelry is regularly featured in Vogue, Elle, L’Officiel, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire and other prestigious fashion publications.
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BJ Beatrix vintage costume jewelry

BJ Beatrix vintage costume jewelry

Christmas bells brooch. Gold tone, rhinestones. 1970s. BJ Beatrix vintage costume jewelry

BJ Beatrix vintage costume jewelry
Nat Sugarman founded The Beatrix jewelry company after the second World War, in 1946. He named it after his sister, Beatrice. At first, the company didn’t mark their decorations, and was not particularly successful. However, all changed in 1965, when Leonard Mundell, the manager of the company became its new owner. Without changing the name, he changed the concept of the company. First of all, he began producing seasonal brooches dedicated to traditional and favorite American holidays. The most popular were, of course, Christmas, Halloween and Easter decorations.
Noteworthy, marking “BJ” or “Beatrix” wasn’t consistent until 1975, but from 1975 to 1977, marking on the back side was constant and mandatory. Traditionally, the designers of the company used gold tone metal, enamel, rhinestones and crystals.
According to Justia Trademarks website, Beatrix Jewelry Company registered several trademarks in 1976 – DUKE, DUCHESS, and HEAVENLY BOUTIQUE. Active for three decades (1946-1977), the company was sold to Treasure Master who only operated until 1983.
Today, included in collector’s guides, signed Beatrix or BJ, this jewelry is collectible.
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Signed Metzke vintage costume jewelry

Signed Metzke vintage costume jewelry

Snail brooch pin. Pewter. Signed Metzke vintage costume jewelry

Signed Metzke vintage costume jewelry

Located in Tallahassee, Florida, American jewelry company Metzke Inc. was founded in 1963. In fact, it was a family business, where the main designers were Dr. Fred W. Metzke and his wife Mary. Thanks to the talent of Dr. Metzke as the artist, and the creativity of his wife Mary, the small family company has grown to one of the largest pewterware manufacturers in the world. Metzke’s clients included such icons as Disney, Smithsonian, Neiman Marcus and Dillard’s. Also, large catalogs of gifts and thousands of small gift shops and boutiques sold their works.

In 1972, their son Stephen joined the family business having become the president of the company. However, in 1997 the company closed its doors, after three decades of successful work. Accordingly, all items marked “Metzke” are vintage and, thanks to their high quality and craftsmanship, are collectible. The price of these products will increase every year.
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Charles Horner vintage costume jewelry

Charles Horner vintage costume jewelry

Sails ship antique rare brooch pin. Faux marcasite staybright alloy (chrome and stainless steel). 4.3 cm. 1940s. Charles Horner vintage costume jewelry

Charles Horner vintage costume jewelry
Resident of English town of Halifax, Charles Horner (1837-1896) was an English jeweler and founder of the Charles Horner of Halifax jewelry company. He founded the company in the 1860s and produced silver jewelry and accessories, including items for needlewomen. Among his more famous jewelry “lines” were Art Nouveau enamel pendants and necklaces, as well as twisted silver wire jewelry, “glass paste” brooches and silver hairpins. Noteworthy, Charles Horner was one of the first to use plastics in jewelry, in particular casein plastics.
Traditionally, all jewelry pieces by this company have hallmarks sterling silver – Chester – 1911 and Charles Horner’s trademark – C.H
The company began voluntary liquidation in 1984 and ceased to exist.
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Stuart Nye vintage costume jewelry

Stuart Nye vintage costume jewelry

Willow three leaf pin. Sterling silver. 1950s. Stuart Nye vintage costume jewelry

Stuart Nye vintage costume jewelry
Large handmade vintage brooch “Willow Leaves” of the famous American brand S. Nye / С. Nye (North Carolina).
Stuart Nye began making handmade (forged) jewelry in the North Carolina mountains in 1933, during the Great depression. The beautiful nature of his native mountainous region inspired him to create original jewelry. He had no experience, bought used jewelry tools and started. He used pieces of copper during World War II, due to the lack of metal, and brass in the 70s when the price of sterling rose sharply.
Always inspired by nature, his jewelry is part of the American modernist tradition. His “Dogwood”, “Willow Leaf”, “Calla Lilia”, “Pine Cone” and other lesser known collections are in high demand, collected and worn all over the world. Undoubtedly, this is a vivid evidence of the relevance of the iconic style that he created over 80 years ago. And this work has been going on for the 87th year of continuous production.
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