Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Signed Rivest vintage costume jewelry

Signed Rivest vintage costume jewelry

Fish brooch. Gold plated metal, enamel. 1970s. Signed Rivest vintage costume jewelry

Signed Rivest vintage costume jewelry
Gaston Rivest and Maida Diver opened their family business shortly after their wedding in 1962. The Rivest family began creating wonderful enamel jewelry in Châteauguay, a suburb of Montreal in southwestern Quebec, Canada.
Handcrafted from gold or silver plated metal and enamel and marked with the words “Rivest Fait Au Quebec made in Canada” on the back, the jewelry is of high quality.

Made in the 1960s and 1970s, Rivest jewelry is rare on the vintage jewelry market and highly collectible.
It is noteworthy that Maida and Gaston founded another company GASTON & MAIDA RIVEST METIERS D’ART ENR in 1985, not related to the jewelry business.
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Signed Vitoge vintage costume jewelry

Signed Vitoge vintage costume jewelry

Tiger figural brooch of gold tone, enamel, rhinestones. 1950s. Signed Vitoge vintage costume jewelry

Signed Vitoge vintage costume jewelry
The history of the Vitoge pearls and rhinestones costume jewelry brand lasted less than two decades. Incorporated in 1957 and headquartered at 153 E 26th St, Manhattan, New York City, Vitoge Mfg Co went out of business in the late 1960s.
The company, headed by Vincent Vitolo, produced gifts and accessories in addition to costume jewelry. Creating classic costume jewelry by hand, designers used gold-plated metal alloys, faux turquoise, pearls, glass cabochons, rhinestones, and enamel. The manufacturer’s marking includes the word VITOGE in capital letters, without a copyright symbol.
According to 1958-1963 catalogs of copyright entries, the company’s designers, in addition to costume jewelry, made candlesticks, frames, metal and jewelry boxes.
Today, Vitoge jewelry is extremely rare on the vintage jewelry market and is highly prized by collectors.
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Мarc Lаbаt vintage costume jewelry

Мarc Lаbаt vintage costume jewelry

Branch entwined with ivy brooch. Gold tone alloy, resin. 10 cm 1980s. Marc Lаbаt vintage costume jewelry

Мarc Lаbаt vintage costume jewelry
Born in the 1950s in the south of France, Marc Labat grew up in the Toulouse region, and graduated from the École Supérieure de Commerce External Trade (ESCE) in Paris. Passionate about travel, he began his career in the jewelry business in South America (Chile and Brazil) in the 1970s.

While traveling around the world, he discovered the use of unconventional materials to create costume jewelry – multi-colored resin, wheat grains and flower petals embedded in the material.

In the early 1980s, Labat returned to Paris to create his own brand of leather goods, accessories, handbags and costume jewelry. A wholesaler of costume jewelry, he opened three boutiques in Paris: 94 rue du Temple, 45 rue Vieille du Temple, and 77 rue de Rennes.

Incorporated in 1986, Мarc Lаbаt Paris company most likely ceased to exist in 2016, and all three boutiques are permanently closed.
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Hogan Bolas vintage costume jewelry

Hogan Bolas vintage costume jewelry

Abstract gold tone cultured pearl brooch pin. 1960s. Hogan Bolas vintage costume jewelry

Hogan Bolas vintage costume jewelry (1951-1991)
The name of the jewelry brand Hogan & Bolas comes from the names of its creators, Robert Hogan (1924-2008) and his first wife Deborah Bolas (1927-1982). A veteran of World War II, Robert came to Providence in 1948 to study jewelry making at the Rhode Island School of Design, where he met his future wife. While still students, Robert and Deborah founded the family business Hogan & Bolas, Inc. in Providence, Rhode Island in the early 1950s.

Designers handcrafted modernist jewelry using silver, bronze, copper, cultured pearl, and enamels. Deborah Bolas Hogan worked for the company for thirty years until her death in 1982. Robert continued to be in the jewelry business for another ten years, but in 1991 he sold the business and retired. Born October 17, 1924 in Lawrence, Massachusetts, Robert Hogan passed away September 23, 2008 in Sugar Hill, New Hampshire.

It is noteworthy that the new owner of the company A.R. Desantis continued the jewelry business, but the style of their jewelry changed slightly. Reopened in 1991, Hogan & Bolas is still active.

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Airoldi vintage costume jewelry

Airoldi vintage costume jewelry

Flower bouquet in a vase vintage brooch. Gold plated silver, gripoix glass. 5.3 cm. Airoldi vintage costume jewelry

Airoldi vintage costume jewelry

The history of costume jewelry brand Airoldi, founded by Francesco and Anna Airoldi, began 50 years ago in the Italian city of Brescia. From the very beginning the family business on manufacture of fashion accessories, bags, and jewellery was successful.
Entirely made in Italy, all Airoldi jewelry has become synonymous with refined style, fine craftsmanship and attention to detail. When making earrings, brooches, pendants, rings, bracelets and necklaces by hand, designers used silver, gold plated, Gripois glass, rhinestones and crystals.
Operating since 1974 in Italy, the brand was also registered in the USA in 1987.
Remarkably, the family business is still active and is now headed by two daughters, Francesca and Alessandra Airoldi. In their view, quality, reliability and customer care are values and their philosophy has not changed.
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L Fonts vintage costume jewelry

L Fonts vintage costume jewelry

Brooch and earrings. 12 K gold, jade. 1970s. L Fonts vintage costume jewelry

L Fonts vintage costume jewelry (1973-1978)

The history of fine L’Fonts costume jewelry marked “L’F” lasted a short period from 1973 to 1978. Launched by a Providence-based conglomerate Amtel, Inc., in Houston, Texas, L’Fonts Ltd Designers’ Collection jewelry was sold in branded boxes with a little information on a paper tag.

According to reports, the Amtel corporation headed by its president Jerome Ottmar (June 13, 1916 – May 13, 1993), employed about 300 people and had two factories for the production of costume jewelry. In addition, Amtel had subsidiaries in the Bronx, New York, where about 125 craftsmen worked. Besides, they had industrial plants in Chicago, Houston, Kansas, and Los Angeles, which employed from 100 to 300 people, including office workers.

Amtel’s designers used high-quality materials – 12 or 14 karat gold, carved shells, cultured pearls, opals, jade, amethyst and other natural stones – to create exquisite filigree jewelry.
Amtel, which Jerome Ottmar had led since 1958, ceased to exist after his retirement in 1978. Noteworthy, Mr. Ottman completely left the jewelry business, taking up other business.

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Roger Michael vintage costume jewelry

Roger Michael vintage costume jewelry

Filigree flower gold tone brooch pin. 1980s. Roger Michael vintage costume jewelry

Roger Michael vintage costume jewelry
Born in November 1937 in Providence, Rhode Island, Roger V. Scungio founded his family business, Roger Michael Ltd., in 1983. The company was registered at 20 Austin Avenue, Greenville, Rhode Island.

Initially, it was a small team of 15 jewelers creating accessories, gifts and costume jewelry under the leadership of Roger (President), his wife Jean D Scungio (Vice President) and Melody Betters (General Manager).

Jewelers have traditionally used gold-toned metal alloys and multi-colored rhinestones to create classic and intricate designer pieces by hand. The manufacturer’s trademark includes the markings “Roger Michael” in script and “pat. pend.”

Notably, Roger was also the owner of the jewelry company RVS Mfg & Co (founded in 1976) and Ceramic City (founded in 1988) in Johnston, Rhode Island.
Ornate scarf clips, pins, brooches and pendants, made primarily in the 1980s by Roger V. Scungio, are extremely rare on the vintage jewelry market today and are highly collectible.

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