Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Signed DoDo vintage costume jewelry

Signed DoDo vintage costume jewelry

Owl on a tree branch brooch pin. Gold plated metal alloy, brown rhinestone. 1990s. Signed DoDo vintage costume jewelry

Signed DoDo vintage costume jewelry
Registered in 1994, Dodo jewelry trademark became a second brand owned by Italian jewelry company Pomellato. Founded in 1967 in Milan by Pino Rabolini, Pomellato followed the concept of prêt-à-porter jewelry, where jewelry is an accessory that can be worn in accordance with changes in clothing. This brand meets a variety of requirements, offering both costume decorations and expensive fine jewelry. Accordingly, the jewelers of this company use a variety of materials. In particular, 9K, 18k yellow and rose gold, silver, pearly and multicolor enamel, diamonds, tsavorites, spinels, sapphires, jade, rhinestones, and metal alloys. Most notable collections include: Nudo, Capri, Sabbia, M’ama Non M’ama, Iconica, Victoria, and Tango.
Noteworthy, the logo of the trademark is an extinct flightless bird dodo. The unusual appearance of Dodo and its significance as one of the most famous extinct animals have repeatedly attracted writers and mass culture figures. Many environmental protection organizations, such as Darrell Wildlife Protection Fund, use Dodo image to attract attention to the protection of endangered species. Similarly, Pomellato uses the image of dodo in a collaboration with WWF Italia.
Since October 2009, Pomellato has changed several owners and chief executive directors, and in July 2013, French-based multinational corporation “Kering” acquired Pomellato.
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Swedish jeweler Gustav Dahlgren

Swedish jeweler Gustav Dahlgren

Modernist design leaf openwork sterling silver brooch. 1962. Work by Swedish jeweler Gustav Dahlgren (1815-1975)

Swedish jeweler Gustav Dahlgren
The history of G. Dahlgren & Co, one of the oldest Swedish companies for the production of gold and silver products, spans more than a century. According to Ernst Fischer’s publication on the history of silver and gold production in Sweden, the company began operations in 1845. Gustav Dahlgren, in partnership with the Gold Goods Share Company, founded Guldvaruaktiebolaget G Dahlgren & Co in 1845, merging the two workshops located in the Oxie area in the southeast of Malmö Municipality, Sweden. Later, a branch of Dahlgren & Co also appeared in Stockholm.

Born in 1815, Gustav Dahlgren was a successful businessman, jeweler and philanthropist. He died in 1875 due to a serious illness. In fact, he did not have a family and children who could be the direct heirs of his business. However, his siblings continued the activities of the company, which went through ups and downs, a change in ownership and, accordingly, a change in product labeling.
So, early jewelry marking included “G A Dahlgren”, then “GD&CO” (Gustav Dahlgren & Co). Noteworthy, Swedish silver and gold products have special markings that include several symbols. G A Dahlgren marking, in particular, included M (city mark for Malmö), 3 crowns (Sweden), S mark (in hexagon indicating 830 silver or higher), and some numbers indicating the year of manufacture. For example, “D9” (for 1954), E9 (1955), V9 (1971), etc.

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New York jewelry designer Herbert Rosenthal

New York jewelry designer Herbert Rosenthal

Bee brooch signed HR. Emerald diamond 18 K gold. 1970s. New York jewelry designer Herbert Rosenthal

New York jewelry designer Herbert Rosenthal
Founded in 1945, Herbert Rosenthal Jewelry Corporation originally manufactured decorations for Christmas trees. In 1962 the corporation registered two jewelry trademarks – “HR” and “Accent On Value” (1962-1984). Active for twenty-five years, HR jewelry trademark ceased to exist in 1987. Traditionally, the company produced finger rings, bracelets, brooches and pins with the use of 18 K gold, silver and precious stones.
Rosenthal mostly specialized in brooches and his business was successful. By the mid 1960’s he created an iconic design of bejeweled bees that brought him fame. The popularity of insect brooches put Rosenthal at the forefront of the fashion, and also caused some problems for the designer. As many other jewelers began creating similar insect designs, Rosenthal repeatedly sued other companies to protect his copyrights in courts.
Rosenthal’s copyrighted style included golden wings, a diamond-studded chest, and vibrant ruby eyes. The decision of the courts was ambiguous – on the one hand, they agreed that the companies were violating his author’s design, but on the other hand, they ruled that his trademark was invalid. Despite the court decision, he remained the exclusive designer of bee brooches, which became even more expensive. Noteworthy, Rosenthal has created several insect designs for Tiffany & Company.
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Japanese Vintage Kuji Amber jewelry

Japanese Vintage Kuji Amber jewelry

Flower brooch. Amber, brass, enamel. 5 cm. 1980s. Kuji Amber jewelry

Japanese Vintage – Kuji Amber jewelry
Traditionally, we associate amber with the Baltic Sea. However, Japanese amber is at least twice as old as Baltic amber. Found in Japan, these semi-precious stones are about 80 million years old. The seaside city of Kuji, located in the northwest of the island of Honshu, is called the Japanese capital of amber. The color shades of Japanese amber are quite varied and differ from the Baltic amber. Yellow and transparent stones are quite rare. More often, amber has orange, dark yellow and brown shades, and even beautiful striped amber that looks like agate. Interestingly, in the Middle Ages in Japan, red amber was especially highly valued, which symbolized the blood of the dragon. Only members of the imperial family could wear jewelry made of red amber.
There are many awarded notable artists and jewelry designers who work with amber. In particular, Wataru Zama, Hiromi Ito, Takenori Moriyama, Yuji Okado, Osamu Omori, Masaaki Sakaguchi, Yasunori Sakamoto, Nobuko Takagi, Misao Uchida, Noriko Hasegawa, and Koichi Yamazaki.
In the past, in this area there were several old schools of amber processing, which were famous throughout Japan. Since 1981, the Kuji Amber Museum Co., Ltd. has been reviving the historical traditions of Kuji-kohaku by decree of the Japanese government. The owner of the museum is a local company Kuji Kohaku. Kuji products – earrings, pendants, brooches, bracelets, watches and pens with amber inserts can be purchased both throughout the country and at the place of production.
Noteworthy, items marked with the word “KUJI” are rare, as Kuji Amber Museum only marked the first jewelry collections.
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Hermann Siersbol vintage silver jewelry

Hermann Siersbol vintage silver jewelry

Bow and leaf design sterling silver brooch. 1950s. Hermann Siersbol vintage silver jewelry

Hermann Siersbol vintage silver jewelry
Highly regarded silversmith, jewelry designer Hermann Siersbøl could have created more than one masterpiece of wearable art, if not for his tragic death at the age of 40.
Born January 24, 1924 in Copenhagen, after leaving school he studied to be a jeweler, and worked as an apprentice for silversmiths. After earning his start-up capital in 1945, he began creating inexpensive handmade jewelry from a variety of materials. Moreover, it was post-war Europe, where women wanted to wear affordable high-quality jewelry. Thanks to his idea to make good jewelry affordable for everybody, his company gradually became one of the largest in Scandinavia.
Keeping the traditions of Scandinavian silversmiths, Hermann created jewelry in a variety of styles, including avant-garde, modernist, geometric and classical designs. Traditionally, he used sterling silver, gold plating, semi-precious stones, and akoya pearls. Noteworthy, his hallmark included “HS” and 830, or sterling 925, Denmark H.S. on oval base.
After the death of the designer on 30th July 1964, his four children continued their father’s business. According to sources, his son Henrik and granddaughter Camilla headed the company in 2010s.
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Franklin Mint vintage costume jewelry

Franklin Mint vintage costume jewelry

The Diamond Unicorn hand painted pendant designed by David Cornell. Solid sterling silver, 22 K gold, art glass, enamel. 1987. Franklin Mint vintage costume jewelry

Franklin Mint vintage costume jewelry
The history of Franklin Mint jewelry trademark spans twenty-two years. Registered in 1975 by Franklin Mint Corporation, the trademark ceased to exist in 1997. Founded by Joseph Segel in 1964 in Wawa, Pennsylvania, the private company Franklin Mint was famous for manufacture of “collectibles” – coins, medals, dolls, sculpture, and jewelry.
Opened in 1922 Egyptian Tomb of Tutankhamun with its preserved valuable artifacts, became one of the largest events in the history of world archeology and a source of inspiration for artists and jewelers. Franklin Mint was no exception. The company’s most notable limited edition collections included Jewels of Tutankhamun. Also, Jewels of India, Jewels of Christmas, and patriotic line of costume jewelry.
Traditionally, the craftsmen used sterling silver, 10K 18K, 24 K gold plating, glass cabochons, lustrous faux pearls, black onyx, and multicolor enamel.
Noteworthy, the company produced jewelry on the designs of such world famous jewelers as Georg Jensen, Gilroy Roberts, David Cornell, Stuart Devlin, Shakira Caine, and others. Also, the company commissioned some designers and jewelry firms, for example Goebel Miniatures. Handmade with exquisite craftsmanship and high quality materials, FM signed limited edition jewelry is collectible vintage.
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Gray Kingsburg vintage costume jewelry

Gray Kingsburg vintage costume jewelry

Detail. Buddha buckle. Brass, turquoise, gold plated. 17.5 cm. 1920s. Gray Kingsburg vintage costume jewelry

Gray Kingsburg vintage costume jewelry
New York-based jewelry designer Gray Kingsburg worked between WWI and WWII, including the Great Depression, 1920-40. Accordingly, the style of his jewelry has undergone many changes in a short period. At the beginning of his career, these were decorations in the Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles, with the use of natural stones and gold plating. Already in the 1930s, due to a downturn in the economy and limited use of precious metals, the designer used brass, copper and alloys of gold and silver tones to compensate for the shortage of gold and silver. Also, the designer used multi-colored art glass imitating precious stones. A distinctive feature of his designs is exquisite filigree handwork, embodied in bracelets, brooches, necklaces, buckles, and dress clips.
Gray Kingsburg, like many other jewelers of the period, drew inspiration from exhibits in various museums and vaults around the world, creating a line of jewelry with Buddhist and Indian motives. Kingsburg’s exquisite filigree jewelry is a collectible rarity in the vintage jewelry market.

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