Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Signed Gigi Giusti vintage costume jewelry

Gigi Giusti vintage costume jewelry

Guardian Angel holding Dove Bird matte gold tone lapel pin. 1994. Signed Gigi Giusti vintage costume jewelry

Gigi Giusti vintage costume jewelry
The history of Gigi signed costume jewelry spans rather short period from 1990 till 2000. Located in Burbank, California, luxury goods and jewelry company Gigi Accessories Inc. had 10 trademarks registered from 1994 to 1998. In particular, Angelica (1994), Hug-a-Bear (1995), Santa’s Pet, Santa’s Secret, Simple Fabulous, Millennium, Simply Charming (all in 1996), Legends og Camelot, and Secrets From the Heart (1998). Since 2000, the status of all these trademarks -cancelled.
Traditionally, the company’s craftsmen used gold and silver tone metal alloys, enamel and rhinestones. They created earrings, bracelets, necklaces, rings, brooches, and more often lapel pins. According to these pieces, the favorite design was angel. The marking on the back side of each piece included “Gigi, Guisti, and USA on oval base. In addition, some items were sold in beautiful velvet boxes, or on paper cards with the inscription “Gigi Accessories Inc.”, “All rights reserved”, “Made in USA”, and the year of manufacture.
Noteworthy, some sources mistakenly name Louis Giusti as Gigi Accessories Inc’s chief designer. However, renowned jewelry designer of 1960s, Louis Giusti created brutalist statement pieces, and signed them with his initials “LG”.
Read more »

Birmingham jeweler Arthur Johnson Smith

Birmingham jeweler Arthur Johnson Smith

Violin brooch. Sterling silver, gold plated. 4.8 cm. 1894. Birmingham jeweler Arthur Johnson Smith

Birmingham jeweler Arthur Johnson Smith
Undoubtedly, the history of AJS jewelry is closely intertwined with the history of England, and particularly, Manchester. Moreover, it was history that dictated the style and design of his jewelry.
Born in the middle of the 19th century, English jeweler Arthur Johnson Smith founded his workshop “Variety Works” in 1882. Located at 46 Frederick Street, Birmingham, the company produced jewelry until the late 1930s. Noteworthy, the building itself, built by the architect Ewen Harper in 1882, was located in the world famous Jewelry district of Birmingham.
Traditionally, during the reign of Queen Victoria, the company’s craftsmen handcrafted exquisite Victorian jewelry. However, with the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, the range of jewelry expanded to mourning locket pendants, pins and brooches. In fact, mourning jewelry became most popular during and after the First World War, which killed 12,320 Birmingham people.
The company’s products became very popular throughout England, and along with Birmingham, their second office appeared in Chester. The labeling included – ‘AJS’, ‘A.J.S’, ‘A · J · S’, Anchor, Lion and some letter. The anchor for the Birmingham assay office, and the lion for sterling silver. Finally, the letter contains the date, for example, M for 1896, P for 1914, O for 1938, etc.
Read more »

Frank Meisler vintage sculpted jewelry

Frank Meisler vintage sculpted jewelry

Amulet brooch against evil eye. Gold plated sterling silver. 4.5 cm. Frank Meisler vintage sculpted jewelry

Frank Meisler vintage sculpted jewelry
World famous Israeli sculptor and architect, Frank Meisler (1929 – 2018) was the author of the monument to Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill in Sochi, as well as memorials in Washington, Miami, Moscow, etc.
However, Tel Aviv based artist was also a brilliant designer of jewelry with intricate compositions. Each of his exquisitely handcrafted brooches or pendants shows the personality of the sculptor with his vision of Judaism. Traditionally, Meisler used 925 sterling silver, gold and a variety of natural stones – onyx, malachite, or lapis. Among the artist’s most famous works are such jewelry series as the Signs of the Zodiac, the Star of David, the Hamsa Amulet or the Hand Amulet. Noteworthy, the uniqueness of jewelry with symbols of Judaism is that they work like magnets to attract the necessary energy. The master signed all his products with his full name in a stylized artistic script.
Created in 1962 “Frank Meisler Ltd”. company went through several re-registrations and updates and is still active.
Read more »

Signed DVF vintage costume jewelry

Signed DVF vintage costume jewelry

Lucite rose with rhinestone accents brooch. 1980s. Signed DVF vintage costume jewelry

Signed DVF vintage costume jewelry
Global lifestyle luxury brand, renowned for its iconic wrap dress and signature prints, DVF jewelry history began about fifty years ago. Its founder, Belgian fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg, named one of the TIME 100 Most Influential People (2015), comes from a wealthy Jewish family.
In 1972 she founded her own company, and began producing ready-to-wear clothing. Soon, along with the production of cosmetics and accessories, she launched costume jewelry. The style of jewelry is varied, from Art Deco to modernist and classic plant and animal designs. Traditionally, jewelry materials include gold and silver tone alloys, lucite, enamel, art glass and rhinestones. The stylish marking consists of the “DvF” logo for Diane von Furstenberg, in an oval cartouche along with the copyright symbol.
Noteworthy, the company was actively producing costume jewelry from the 1970s to the 1990s. During this time, DVF collaborated with such jewelry brands as Haskell Jewels, and H. Stern. According to sources, DVF resumed the production of branded jewelry in 2014.
Read more »

DFB Briggs vintage costume jewelry

DFB Briggs vintage costume jewelry

Amethyst glass rhinestone gold tone brass stretch bracelet. 1930s. DFB Briggs vintage costume jewelry

DFB Briggs vintage costume jewelry
The history of the American jewelry company D.F.B Co began in Attleboro, Massachusetts in 1882. According to “The New England Magazine” (1908), the company belonged to W. C. Tappan (July 4, 1864 – June 8, 1907) and his brother Charles.
An important turning point in the company’s activities was the invention patented on May 20 1890. In particular, a patent for a bracelet that could be stretched not due to banal elastic bands, but with the help of a hinged connection of the links. In 1903 they began the manufacture of the famous Carmen bracelet, signed “Carmen” and sometimes even diminutively Carmelita – in honor of the daughter of one of the owners of the company. Made until 1940s, the design of bracelets changed slightly over the years. So, instead of engraving with a graceful floral design, filigree inserts with glass cabochons imitating natural stones and rhinestones appeared. In addition, the engraving was often personalized, for example, with the name of the owner or love letters.
The company became the largest manufacturers of compacts, chains, bracelets, earrings, etc. and had offices in New York, Chicago, st. Louis and London.
Traditionally, the company’s craftsmen used sterling silver, gold filling or plating, and guilloche enamel. They labeled products with “D.F.B. Co.”, made in USA, Carmen, and Patented.
Noteworthy, D.F.B. marking was last used in 1922 as the company name changed to Briggs, Bates & Bacon. Bates & Bacon also belonged to Tappan brothers, which they purchased in 1907. The company ceased to exist in 1950. Extremely rare, the products of this company are highly collectible.
Read more »

Bell Trading vintage costume jewelry

Bell Trading vintage costume jewelry

Butterfly copper brooch. 1940s. Bell Trading vintage costume jewelry

Bell Trading vintage costume jewelry
The history of “Bell Trading Post Inc” began at the height of the Great Depression in 1932 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Its founders, Jack Michelson and his wife, Mildred, hired Native Americans, famous for their craftsmanship in silver and turquoise jewelry. For them, it was a good opportunity to survive this difficult time by selling products to tourists.
The company’s name comes from the maiden name of Mildred, and the marking includes the word Bell, or the image of a bell. In addition, some pieces include “Nickel Silver”, “Solid Copper”, or “Sterling” marking. Noteworthy, the image of the bell in the marking appeared in the 1950s, after the death of Jack Michelson in 1957. His two sons and daughter continued the family business. Traditionally, the company’s craftsmen used silver, nickel, brass, copper, gold and semi-precious stones, as well as faux gems.
Having become part of the larger Sunbell Corporation, along with three other jewelry firms, the Bell Trading Post Inc ceased to exist in 1969.
Read more »

Jean Painleve vintage costume jewelry

Jean Painleve vintage costume jewelry

Gryphon brooch. Galalith, brass. 1930s. Jean Painleve vintage costume jewelry

Jean Painleve vintage costume jewelry
French scientist, son of the Prime Minister of France, Parisian anarchist and founder of scientific documentary films, Jean Painlevé (1902-1989) was also a jewelry designer. As they say, a talented person is talented in everything. Founder of the Institute for Scientific Cinema (1930), after the Second World War he became President of the French Federation of Film Clubs.
Noteworthy, during 1930-40s he became interested in jewelry design and even launched a series of jewelry. Made with exquisite design and high quality workmanship, his wearable art pieces were sold in expensive boutiques and department stores. And in 1936, together with his partner Geneviève Hamon, he opened his own jewelry boutique at rue de Braque in Paris.
He viewed nature as an eternal poetry, and the greatest inspiration for his creativity. Fascinated by marine life, he directed such films as Killers in Freshwater (1947), Sea Ballerinas (1956), and The Love Life of an Octopus (1967). Accordingly, the design of his jewelry often includes sea creatures, and most often it is a seahorse. Even more, he often marked his jewelry pieces with “JHP” (Jean Hippocampe Painlevé), and hippocampe means seahorse. According to belief, his jewelry was the first ever example of film merchandising. Traditionally, the craftsman used brass and galalith of various colors. Painlevé vintage jewelry is hard to find and highly collectible.
Read more »