Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Avant-garde design 925 sterling silver brooch. 4.2 cm. 1960s. Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry

Andreas Daub vintage costume jewelry
The history of the German jewelry brand “Andreas Daub” began about 150 years ago in the jewelry capital of Germany, the city of Pforzheim. The young jeweler Andreas Daub founded his family business in 1872, which has worked for five generations. Already at the beginning of the 20th century, the company became one of the leading companies in the German jewelry industry and one of the leading jewelry companies in Europe. Kurt Daub, the fifth generation jeweler, leads the company today.
The company produces premium, avant-garde, Victorian and Art Nouveau jewelry. Traditionally, jewelry markings include the initials A * D, as well as the purity of the metal. Noteworthy, the “Amerikaner” stamp is guaranteed to indicate the presence of gold in the product. Along with gold and copper, the company’s jewelers used sterling silver and natural stones such as corals, amethysts and even diamonds. Also, faux pearls, and glass cabochons imitating precious stones. High quality hand-made vintage jewelry hallmarked “Andreas Daub” is rare and highly collectible now.

Read more »

Elee vintage costume jewelry

Elee vintage costume jewelry

Sun drop dangle clip-on-earrings. Gold plated metal alloy, glass beads. 1980s. Elee vintage costume jewelry

Elee vintage costume jewelry
Dallas, Texas based “Elee Designs, Inc.” jewelry company was in business for a few years, from 11 October 1989 to
13 February 2004. Headed by Elaine Rutchik (b. 1938), director and president of the company, jewelers made high-quality, spectacular and large statement pieces. Traditionally made of rich 24 K gold plated metal, it was a series of long clip-on earrings or button shaped clips of bold, geometric and Art Deco design. Also, the craftsmen used enamel, rhinestones, glass beads, art glass, and faux pearls.
The marking on the back side of each piece includes the written word “Elee” on oval base.
Read more »

Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Art Nouveau Griffin Dragon pin. 14k Gold, pearl, ruby. Carter Gough antique costume jewelry

Carter Gough antique costume jewelry
Born on January 17, 1817 in Newark, New Jersey, Aaron Carter was the founder of the jewelry company later known as “Carter, Gough & Co”. Aged 15, he studied jewelry for 6 years at local goldsmiths Taylor and Baldwin. After completing his studies in 1938, he began working as an apprentice at Newark jewelry factory, and from 1941 he started an independent business, in partnership with other jewelers. In particular, A. Pennington and Michael Doremus (1841-1844), and John R. Pierson (1848-1856). Accordingly, with the change of partners, the name of his company also changed – Carter & Doremus, Carter & Pierson; Carter, Howkins & Uodd; Carter, Howkins & Sloan. In 1876 Aaron’s eldest son William joined his business, when the company’s name was Carter, Howkins & Sloan.
Aaron Carter died on 31 Jan 1902 in Orange NJ. His fifty-three-year-old son William Tuttle Carter (born 28 September 1849) took over the company, which in 1915 changed its name to Carter, Gough & Co.
The company produced handcrafted jewelry in Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles. They used gold plating, enamel, pearls, amethyst and other stones to create cufflinks, bar brooches, circle pins, charms and pendants. Traditionally, they marked their pieces with a “C” inside an arrowhead. Lovers and collectors of vintage and antique jewelry appreciate the company’s work for its high quality and exquisite design.
Unfortunately, there is no exact date for the closure of the company or the date of William’s death.
Read more »

Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma

Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)

Kachina pendant. 1970s. Sterling silver, mixed metals. Work by Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)

Native American goldsmith Charles Loloma (1921-1971)
Third Mesa, Arizona based goldsmith Charles Loloma stood firmly in the tradition of contemporary American gold smithing. He studied ceramics at the School for American Craftsmen at Alfred University in upstate New York, but moved into jewelry making in the 1950s. For more than twenty years he traveled the world both to teach and to study. True to his original vision, Loloma used to say “I could appreciate what was done in Egypt, but when I got home, I did my own designs”.
For a thousand years, Loloma and his ancestors have lived in the Hopi village. A member of the Badger Clan of the Hopi Nation, Loloma’s distinctive Native American style springs from the combination of artistry, materials, and imagination. Jewelry pieces created by the artist is the essence of the Hopi in Loloma, the closeness with the land, the connection with his tribe and his traditions.
Traditionally, Loloma used gold, sterling silver, turquoise, coral, ironwood, and ivory, lapis and other natural stones. He artfully signed his pieces “Loloma”. The jeweler has created truly timeless museum worth designs, which are highly collectible now.
Loloma died in 1991 at the age of 70.
Read more »

American jewelry designer Donald Friedlich

American jewelry designer Donald Friedlich

Clothes Pins. Brass, gold and silver plated; etched and assembled. 1983. Work by American jewelry designer Donald Friedlich

American jewelry designer Donald Friedlich
Born in 1954, Donald Friedlich is a talented professional artist, designer and many awarded innovative jeweler. First, he studied jewelry at the University of Vermont and later at the Rhode Island School of Design, from which he graduated in 1982. Totally committed to the form, Friedlich sees his jewelry as an expression of ideas, and he rejects conventional approaches, themes, and materials. Committed to alternative materials, one of his lines became a series of earrings made from a laminate. Traditionally, he creates pieces that in every aspect reveal the sculptor at work. Featured here series of vintage abstract brooches created in 1980s is of high collectible value.
Devoted to the abstract, Friedlich works in series, for example, “Erosion,” “Balance,” “Interference”, etc.
Noteworthy, the Japanese esthetic underlies his work most clearly, the work of the sculptor Noguchi, or
Japanese gardens, or even traditional Japanese packaging.
According to the artist, his goal in these small pieces is to create a powerful impression, something dynamic, interesting and also beautiful.
Read more »

Reed & Barton vintage silver jewelry

Reed & Barton vintage silver jewelry

Night Owl pendant. Sterling silver, gold plated. Damascene collection. 1970s. Reed & Barton vintage silver jewelry

Reed & Barton vintage silver jewelry
Taunton, Massachusetts-based company Reed & Barton was one of the oldest American silverware companies, which history spans nearly two hundred years. According to some sources, the company was founded in 1824. In fact, the first mention of Reed & Barton dates back to 1840. The reason for this is that founded in 1824 silverware company belonged to Isaac Babbitt, and it had a different name – Babbitt & Crossma. In 1840, Henry G. Reed and his partner Charles E. Barton bought the company out and registered it under their own name, Reed & Barton.
Undoubtedly, for two hundred years of its existence, the company experienced recessions and booms, changes of owners and production interruptions. However, high craftsmanship and a variety of designs remained constant. Traditionally, the company’s craftsmen used sterling silver, copper, 24 K gold, bronze, and cloisonne enamels. Some limited collections have become iconic and today are collectible rarities. In particular, Damascene, Egyptian Revival, Christmas crosses, month flower pendants, fork and spoon bracelets.
Noteworthy, the company owned other trademarks for the production of silver ware and jewelry. One of them, for example, was Eureka Mfg. Co. Inc., registered in Norton, Massachusetts in 1926.
During the Civil War and World Wars, the company carried out orders from the state. Also, the company manufactured medals for 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, and its products are on display at the White House.
The company ceased to exist in 2015, having become the property of The Lenox Company.
Read more »

Loris Azzaro vintage costume jewelry

Loris Azzaro vintage costume jewelry

Oh la la perfume bottle brooch. Brass, amber color lucite, plastic. 6.8 cm. 1993. Loris Azzaro vintage costume jewelry

Loris Azzaro vintage costume jewelry
The history of the Azzaro brand has been traditionally traced back to 1962, when its founder, Loris Azzaro, came to Paris. Born into an Italian family in Tunisia, Azzaro spent his childhood and youth there. He studied in Toulouse, France, and after graduation taught French and Italian in Tunisia. However, the turning point in his biography became his arrival in Paris in 1962.
An innovator with impeccable taste, a writer, and a talented designer, Loris immediately began creating original accessories. At first, he gave them to his wife Michelle Carsy, and close friends, but very quickly his fame spread throughout all the fashionistas of Paris. Among the fans of his talent were the brightest stars of that time. In particular, Brigitte Bordeaux, Claudia Cardinale, Sophia Loren, Liza Minnelli, Barbara Streisand, Romy Schneider, Nicole Kidman, Kate Winslet, Isabelle Adjani and many more. Also, among his clients were such high society figures as the Princess of Monaco, the Empress of Iran, and the Duchess of Orleans.
Read more »