Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Signed L-S vintage costume jewelry

Signed L-S vintage costume jewelry

Pink roses bouquet brooch. Silver and gold tone alloy, enamel, rhinestones. 1970s. Signed L-S vintage costume jewelry

Signed L-S vintage costume jewelry
The history of L-S jewelry began in 1931, when New York, N.Y. based company Levine-Simson Inc, registered its trademark. The company manufactured costume jewelry for more than five decades, with short break during 1940s. The renewed trademark registered in 1947 and 1962, ceased to exist in 1988.
Vintage costume jewelry of this brand is distinguished by high quality workmanship, an abundance of rhinestones and gold-tone metal. Traditionally, the marking includes two capital letters L – C on a rectangular base, and without a copyright sign.
Noteworthy, decorations created by this company are often confused with other brands. And this is not surprising, since there are no less than ten trademarks with the same initials LS. In particular, LS Louis Stern, LS Lauren Spencer, LS Laurence Seegers (1973-1998), LS (Lee Sands) and even modern jewelry brands with the same initials. However, the style of marking of all these companies is completely different, not to mention the design.
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Kultaseppa Salovaara vintage silver jewelry

Kultaseppa Salovaara vintage silver jewelry

Geometric design brooch pin. Zircon, sterling silver. 1965. Kultaseppa Salovaara vintage silver jewelry

Kultaseppa Salovaara vintage silver jewelry
The largest precious metals companies in Turku operating in the 1960s and 1970s were Auran Kultaseppä, Kultateollisuus, Kupittaan Kulta, Turku Hopea, and more. There were also several smaller companies, many shops and workshops in the area. At its best, more than a thousand people worked in precious metals companies in Turku and won numerous international awards. One of these renowned companies was Kultasepät Salovaara (Kultasepät means goldsmith).
Finnish hereditary goldsmith Veikko Salovaara founded his family business Kultaseppa Salovaara in 1953 in Kaarina, neighbouring town of Turku. Among his ancestors, to name a few, were goldsmiths Markus Eliel Salovaara (1904 – 1993) and Armas Artturi Salovaara (November 19, 1883 – May 1, 1937).
Besides, most notable designers worked for the company, which in 1960-70s employed about one hundred silversmiths. One of them was Jorma Laine (1930-2002), who also worked for Hopea jewelry company. She signed her pieces with her name and added the company stamps. Noteworthy, Veikko Salovaara himself created his jewelry line under the name of Kalevi Sara.
Veikko Salovaara retired in 1988 and later sold his company.
Renowned and collectable, Salovaara handcrafted jewelry shows high quality and the use of silver, gold, bronze and natural gems. The marking includes the image of a Polar Bear on an Iceberg – the company’s logo, and traditional Finnish stamps. Among them – crown for Finland, letter and number for year (e.g. G7 for 1960, M7 – 1965, H7 – 1961, etc.), and the city mark for Turku.
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Signed H.I. vintage costume jewelry

Signed H.I. vintage costume jewelry

Clown brooch movable legs pendant. Gold plated metal alloy, green and blue enamel. 5 cm. 1980s. Signed H.I. vintage costume jewelry

Signed H.I. vintage costume jewelry
Vintage pins, bracelets, pendants and brooches made by this company are extremely rare, and the history of the H.I. trademark is shrouded in mystery. However, it is known that the trademark existed for no more than a decade, in the period 1980-1990s. Noteworthy, this brand is related to the famous jewelry company “R. Mandle”.
Renowned hereditary jeweler Robert N. Mandle registered his own company “R. Mandle” in 1956 and owned the company until his retirement in 1990. He used to sell out his invaluable jewelry molds, which later appeared as brooches and pins signed by other manufacturers. Among them, in particular, was Providence based jewelry company which labeled its jewelry pieces with two uppercase letters H.I. (cursive fancy fonts), withought a copyright sign.
The quality hand-made costume jewelry of this brand dates back to the 1980s and is therefore considered vintage. In the manufacture of these figural pieces, craftsmen traditionally used gold-tone metal alloys, gilding, bright enamels and rhinestones. Also, the most notable design of this brand – multicolored clown pins handcrafted with articulated movable parts.
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Signed Butler vintage costume jewelry

Signed Butler vintage costume jewelry

Theatrical mask brooch. Gold tone metal alloy, Swarovski crystals. Fifth Avenue collection. 1990s. Signed Butler vintage costume jewelry

Signed Butler vintage costume jewelry
The history of the Canadian costume jewelry brand Butler began more than 30 years ago, in 1988, when the married couple Jay and Betty Butler decided to create their family business. The creative duo began handcrafting beautiful pieces of jewelry and sold them at markets, exhibitions, and home parties. Over time, the business expanded and the company was able to employ craftsmen from different countries. In addition, the grown up sons, who used to help their parents, joined the business as professional gemologists and goldsmiths.
Noteworthy, the trademark Butler Gem Fifth Avenue Collection registered in 1988 and located in Saskatchewan, Canada, existed until 1998. Vintage handmade pieces created in this period show exquisite designs and high quality. Traditionally, Butler masters used metal alloys of gold tone, enamel, Swarovski crystals, fine rhinestones, faux pearls, and natural gems. The marking includes the word Butler in a rectangular frame, and/or FAC (Fifth Avenue Collection).
Today Fifth Avenue Collection Ltd. is an international direct sales company with more than 20,000 jewellers throughout the world. The president of the company is Jay Butler.
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Karen Lynne vintage costume jewelry

Karen Lynne vintage costume jewelry

Scarab stones 12 K gold filled circle brooch, clip on earrings and bracelet. 1960s. Karen Lynne vintage costume jewelry

Karen Lynne vintage costume jewelry
The history of Karen Lynne jewelry trademark began in 1954, when Charles Rothman established his family business – jewelry company Charles Rothman Co. Inc. in Providence, Rhode Island. His son Robert Hillel Rothman (1927 – 2019) joined the family business. The same year Charles registered two jewelry trademarks – “Lynda Sue Key Quality” and “Karen Lynne Key Quality”. Noteworthy, before founding his company, Charles Rothman had worked in Goldstein Poland Co. jewelry company.
Traditionally, the company made high quality handcrafted costume jewelry with the use of 12 and 14 K gold, sterling silver, genuine jade, ivory, scarab stones and cultured pearls. From the very beginning, the marking included the initials KL with dots and the purity of gold. Sold in big stores, their classic circle pins, carved ivory roses, filigree cameos, jade bracelets, necklaces, and earrings were very popular in the 1960-70s.
The Karen Lynne trademark ceased to exist in 1994.
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John Atkins & Sons vintage silver jewelry

John Atkins & Sons vintage silver jewelry

Butterfly brooch. 925 silver, enamel. 1918. John Atkins & Sons vintage silver jewelry

John Atkins & Sons vintage silver jewelry
The history of one of the most famous and oldest British companies John Atkins & Sons started over a hundred years ago in Spencer Street in the famous jewelry quarter in Birmingham, England. Initially, they specialized in a variety of women’s and men’s silver accessories and were renowned for their silver guilloché enamel work. After the 1920s, Atkin & Sons Ltd moved to Bradford Street, and in the early 1960s the company changed its name to Atkin & Sons (Birmingham) Ltd.
Traditionally, the craftsmen of this company made brooches, pendants and bracelets in the Edwardian and Art Nouveau styles. Most of the designs included multicolored butterflies and dragonflies with the use of silver and guilloché enamel. The craftsmen marked their products with JA & S stamp, sterling and traditional British stamps. Noteworthy, British silverware has a special standard set of stamps. In particular, the stamp of the British standard, the city of production, the year of manufacture stamp and the brand of the manufacturer. If the item has less than four hallmarks, it is either made in another country or is not silver. Meanwhile, until the end of the era of Queen Victoria, appeared the fifth stamp. It meant the payment of tax from the product in favor of the state. The Birmingham brand “anchor” is a sign of high quality and undeniable authority. The absence of this mark indicates that the item was not manufactured in Birmingham.

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John Michael Richardson vintage costume jewelry

John Michael Richardson vintage costume jewelry

Tribal motif dangling brooch inspired by travel to India. Mixed metals, plastic. 8 cm. 1990s. John Michael Richardson vintage costume jewelry

John Michael Richardson vintage costume jewelry

The history of the John Michael Richardson brand began in New York City, when a graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Art (1976) decided to create jewelry. Sold in boutiques, his jewelry became popular, and in 1984 he registered John Michael Richards Jewelry Incorporated.
An award winning jewelry designer, Richardson uses authentic elements of vintage oriental jewelry, skillfully combining them with modern materials. The variety of materials is amazing – from wood and gold to velvet and mother-of pearl. Every time he travels the world he discovers new elements for his accessories, and draws on the traditional crafts of each particular country.
Inspired by travels to India, China, Greece, Israel, Thailand, and other countries, Richardson has created several collections in his factory in West Warwick, Rhode Island. Among them are Decorative Items, Antique Thais, Temple by Moonlight, Arabian Nights, Beyond the Earth, Royal Thais, and many other collections. In addition, the jeweler transmits his messages on a card to which the jewelry is attached.

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