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Jewellery kaleidoscope

Rochas vintage costume jewelry

Rochas vintage costume jewelry

Flower gold plated brooch. 4 cm. 1980s. Rochas vintage costume jewelry

Rochas vintage costume jewelry
The history of Rochas costume jewelry began in 1979, but the Rochas brand is almost 100 years old.
French couturier and perfumer, Marcel Louis Jules Rochas (February 24, 1902 – March 14, 1955) opened his fashion house almost 100 years ago, in 1925. The 22-year-old couturier created his fashion house in collaboration with his first wife Yvonne Coutanceau (1900-1987). Located at 100 rue Faubourg Saint-Honoré, the motto of Marcel Rochas was “Elegance, simplicity, and youth”.
In 1929 he married the Italian artist Rina Rosselli (1903–1998), with whom he often visited Parisian artistic circles. In June 1933, the fashion house moved to 12 Avenue Matignon, where it would remain until 1955, the year of the designer’s death. His style was simple and he became an innovative fashion designer known for his talent as a colorist.
In 1945, the company began to collaborate with the Parisian theater project “Théatre de la Mode”, which presented a collection of dolls dressed in miniature clothes, jewelry and shoes made by famous Fashion Houses. The doll, dressed by Marcel, wore a black corduroy dress with a collar adorned with diamonds and platinum.
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Dolce Vita vintage costume jewelry

Dolce Vita vintage costume jewelry

Outer space star brooch. Silver plated metal, blue crystals. 4 cm. 1980s. Dolce Vita vintage costume jewelry

Dolce Vita vintage costume jewelry
The history of the French costume jewelry brand Dolce Vita (Sweet Life) began in a small Parisian workshop in the late 1970s. Made by hand, the company’s products are easily recognizable as they have their own unique style. These are statement geometric, haute couture, bold designs, and the use of textured “crumpled gold”. Also, silver plating, lucite, art glass imitating amber, amethyst, and other semi-precious stones. An other characteristic feature is the absence or rare use of rhinestones and enamels, so typical for most costume jewelry companies. Traditionally, Dolce Vita jewelry is always a symbiosis of French chic and excellent quality, as well as a great addition to the collection for lovers of vintage designer jewelry.
Noteworthy, the labeling of products differs, in accordance with the artistic intent and design. In particular, most often it is “Dolce Vita” on a heart-shaped base, or “Dolce Vita” Paris in a rectangle, or “Dolce Vita” in an oval. Also, even one piece can have two different markings. For example, labeled with rectangular marking bracelet may have the charm with a heart-shaped mark.
The company ceased to exist in the late 1990s.
Another jewelry company of the same name (Dolce Vita Bijoux) appeared in 1997 at 159, rue du Temple 75003 Paris. However, its style, design, technique and materials is different.
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French jewelry company Lacloche Freres

French jewelry company Lacloche Freres. Basket of flowers brooch. Platinum, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds. 1920

Basket of flowers brooch. Platinum, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds. 1920. French jewelry company Lacloche Freres

French jewelry company Lacloche Freres
The illustrious history of the family business Lacloche is one of the greatest gems of Parisian jewelry from the Belle Epoque to the 1960s. The company was known for its elegant designs and exquisite craftsmanship. Their tiaras, bracelets, pins, watches and women’s accessories (dressing tables, cigarette cases) embody the spirit of Art Nouveau and Art Deco and are some of their most famous creations. Their four generation products have adorned many crowned heads, including Queen Victoria of Spain, Duchess of Westminster, Kings of Greece and Siam, and Grace Kelly. Marked with Lacloche Frères, then Jacques Lacloche, the jewelry was created by the best workshops in Paris. In particular, Langlois, Péry, Rubel, Strauss Allard et Meyer ou Verger.

Having individually several stores in France and Spain, the three Lacloche brothers officially united in 1901. Noteworthy, they united under the name “Lacloche Frères”. First, they settled in the very center of Paris at 15 Rue de la Paix. Three years later they moved to London and then to Spain, Argentina and Egypt. Their collaborations with many of the finest jewelers of the era have produced masterpieces in a wide variety of styles, including the stylish Egyptian and East Asian Art Deco.
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Soviet vintage costume jewelry

Soviet vintage costume jewelry

Kokoshnik brooch. Gold tone metal, crystals. Moscow, 1963. Soviet vintage costume jewelry

Soviet vintage costume jewelry
First of all, there were no private jewelry workshops in the Soviet Union, at least officially registered. Instead, there were state-owned jewelry workshops and factories producing both expensive and costume jewelry. Traditionally, the vintage jewelry market offers products from the Ural, Leningrad, Shcherbinsky metal haberdashery and jewelry factories. Also, products of the Soviet republics that were once part of a single country called the USSR. In particular, the products of the Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR), Tallinn (Estonian SSR) factories, the Yerevan experimental plant “Souvenir” (Armenian SSR), and others.
Formed on the basis of a workshop at the Ural Society of Natural Science Lovers, Sverdlovsk Jewelry Factory was one of the most significant and important factories. The craftsmen made jewelry from silver and gold with jasper, rhodonite, corundum and other gems and precious stones.
The Amber Factory of the city of Kaliningrad was and remains famous producer of amber jewelry. Also, Veliky Ustyug and the Severnaya Chern factory produced exquisite museum worth wearable art jewelry.
Noteworthy, Soviet jewelry designers preferred to use natural gems and semi-precious stones instead of rhinestones, or art glass imitating gems.
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Signed Elle vintage costume jewelry

Signed Elle vintage costume jewelry

Clown with balloons brooch. Gold tone metal, enamel. 7.8 cm. 1970s. Signed Elle vintage costume jewelry

Signed Elle vintage costume jewelry
Using fashion as a benchmark for creative inspiration, ELLE’s designs, like the pages of ELLE magazine, changed from season to season as colors and fashion trends changed. A series of figural clown brooches in colorful enamel clothing on gold-tone metal, marked on the back with capital letters “Elle”, appeared in the mid-1980s. Circus-inspired style, bright clothes, and statement jewelry was in the 1980s fashion trend, partly embodied in the casual style.
Magazine Elle was first published on October 1, 1945 in Paris, but the history of costume jewelry labeled Elle began in the 1960s. The English translation of the French word “Elle” is “She”, it was SHE who became the inspiration for the first jewelry pieces. A tall and slender model from the runway or from the pages of a fashion magazine formed the basis of the design of the 1960s.
The value of vintage jewelry made in the 1960-80s is that the jewelers made them by hand. Hand painted in bright colors, each brooch, each bracelet, or a pair of clips is a work of art. Traditionally, jewelers used high-quality alloys of metals, zinc, rhodium, and sometimes 10 K gold and silver. Jewelry made before the 1990s is quite heavy, in contrast to jewelry made from lightweight aluminum after the 1990s.
Elle markings include: “ELLE” (1960-80s), “Elle Woman Paris” (1980s), and since 1990s – “925 Elle China”.
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Anne & Jane Harvey vintage artisan jewelry

Anne & Jane Harvey vintage artisan jewelry

Proverbial designs of fact and fable by Harvey sisters Anna and Jane, rendered by the fine traditional silver smiths of Taxco, Mexico. Anne & Jane Harvey vintage artisan jewelry

Anne & Jane Harvey vintage artisan jewelry
American artist and silversmith, Jane Harvey (b. 1964) established her family business “Anne & Jane” in 1989. It was a jewelry studio located at 850 E Oak St Fort Bragg​, California. Anne Harvey, who worked in Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico (since 1984), moved to Fort Bragg​ and joined the family business. Talented artists and designers, the sisters created whimsical pendants, earrings and brooches from sterling silver, metal alloys and enamel by hand. Traditionally, their designs included animalistic and nature inspired motifs, as well as houses and objects. They signed their jewelry creations with “A & J Harvey 925”.
In fact, most vintage items have marking “Anne Harvey Mexico sterling”, as they were made in Taxco, Mexico, before Anne joined her sister’s business. Thus, the history of jewelry of the Harvey sisters is more than 30 years old. Noteworthy, their last large collection of realistic cats, dog breeds, as well as deer, leaves designs appeared in 2017.
Undoubtedly, the unique artisan jewelry of the Harvey sisters is difficult to confuse with the works of other jewelers. Handcrafted in limited editions, these vintage pieces are collectible.
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Eric Russell and Caroline Strieb jewelry art

Eric Russell and Caroline Strieb jewelry art

Abstract design brooch by Caroline Strieb. Sterling silver, 18k gold, opals, carved onyx. 1987. Eric Russell and Caroline Strieb jewelry art

Eric Russell and Caroline Strieb jewelry art
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania based innovative goldsmith, Eric Russell (b. 1954) began making jewelry at the age of fourteen. And he was hanging around craft shows while he was still in high school. Strieb and Russell met by chance in the Philadelphia studio of Jonathan Stember in 1979. Strieb was working there on her course artwork at Philadelphia College of Art. And Russell was working there for the Rhinebeck Craft Show. He got together with Caroline in 1979, and they both reinforced and supported each other.
In 1982, they launched their creative family business. Through the years, Russell and Strieb’s work has retained the sense of controlled chaos-there are many elements in each piece, but they always coexisted harmoniously. Russell’s work grew more complicated in technique as the years went by, and his skills grew along with his artistic vision. From 1981 through 1985, Russell and Strieb took part in art exhibitions and sold their jewelry at gallery shows.
Traditionally, the designers used sterling silver, 14k, 18k, and 22k gold, colored gemstones, tourmaline, pearls, diamonds and other gems and minerals.
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