Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Japanese jewellery brand Gimel

Japanese jewellery brand Gimel

The colors of the autumn leaf perfectly conveyed by garnets of different shades, as well as green and yellow diamonds. On the reverse side there is a tiny snail made from sapphire and diamonds. Japanese jewellery brand Gimel

Japanese jewellery brand Gimel
Talented Japanese designer Kaoru Kay Akihara founded her firm “Gimel” in 1992. She received an excellent education, studying, along with the economy, jewelry design and painting. In addition, studied the traditional Japanese art of ikebana and the laws of the tea ceremony. The latter clearly had an impact on the design of products of the firm “Gimel”. With the inherent subtlety of Japanese art, they embody elusive moments of the changing seasons, where ephemeral features of seasonal changes are noticeable. So, delicate pink spring buds, rich yellow tones of summer flowers, purple autumn leaves turn into jewelry with the help of carefully selected gems. According to Kaoru Kay Akihara, “history should be behind the decoration,” and many of her works are decorated with tiny details, for example, a small snail crawling on the inside of the brooch leaf – a secret that the jewelery owner can possess. Thanks to such details, Gimel products are unique and very special.
Japan’s natural beauty is a source of inspiration for Gimel masters. Someone wonders what is unusual in these familiar images: a leaf, a flower, a frog, a bird … The answer lies in the details – amazing precision and charm. Noteworthy, Akihara herself selects the smallest pebbles, because paints and shades are very important for her. With her work, she tries to capture the beauty of nature at its best moments, while the fire of life burns in it. The jeweler uses gems as a palette.

Japanese jewellery brand Gimel

Saturn. A brooch in platinum with white opal and diamonds. Japanese jewellery brand Gimel

Born in 1944 in the family of a businessman, Mrs. Akihara represents one of the oldest aristocratic families in Japan (according to belief, she is a relative of the imperial family) and received an excellent, versatile education. Japanese brought aesthetics to absolutism, because knowledge in the field of floristics, drawing, and tea ceremony art. It was precisely the subtle perception of the surrounding world that became the basis of the jewelery style of Mrs. Akihara. In 2000, Sotheby’s recognized her as “one of the most revolutionary and influential jewelers of the 21st century.”

Japanese jewellery brand Gimel