Kaleidoscope effect

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Francisco Rebajes copper jewellery art

Francisco Rebajes copper jewellery art

African head with necklace and earrings copper brooch. The end of the 1940s. 8 cm. £ 200-240 CRIS. Francisco Rebajes copper jewellery art

Francisco Rebajes copper jewellery art
This is an inspired by African motifs original copper brooch with the image of an exotic Ubangi girl. The designer of his own jewellery line, Francisco Rebajes drew inspiration from the symbolism of ethnic masks and surrealism. In fact, creating his handmade copper decorations he followed the artistic principles of modernism: flexible fluid lines and stylized floral motifs.
Born in Spain in 1906, the future jewelry designer 16 year-old Francisco Rebajes moved to New York City in 1922. Like all emigrants, he took on any job. In 1932, he married Pauline Schwartz, against the wishes of her parents. Paulina and Frank began living in their friends’ apartment, where Frank set up a small workshop. The first collection of figures that Rebajes made from cans impressed the director of the Whitney Museum, Julian Fors, who bought it. This was the beginning of the great master’s journey.
In 1934 he opened a studio shop in New York City. Frank’s career reached its peak in the 1950s, when he had a store on Fifth Avenue. There he sold jewelry and art objects until 1967. However, by the 1960s he stopped making jewellery and focused on sculpture.
After returning to Spain, he made jewelry until his death in 1990.

Theatrical masks surreal brooch made of copper

Theatrical masks surreal brooch made of copper

These years, Rebajes sold his products throughout the country. He employed more than 100 jewelers, embodying his designs. Frank’s decorations in modern style, captivate with their originality and freshness.

Ubangi Tribal face with pearl earring, copper brooch pendant

Ubangi Tribal face with pearl earring, copper brooch pendant

In the 1970s, Rebajes became actively engaged in sculpture, and his exhibitions were a great success. Unfortunately, due to his wife’s severe illness, Rebajes had to sell his shops and workshops. Frank Rebajes died in the 1990s. His works are in many museums around the world.

Francisco Rebajes copper jewellery art