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Category Archive: Symbolism

Cats in mythology and jewellery

Cats in mythology and jewellery

Cats in mythology and jewellery

Cats in mythology and jewellery. Prowling the night with glowing eyes, showing extraordinary physical flexibility and agility, cats were believed to seek the companionship of old women who practiced magic as witches. Both witches and cats were believed to have the power to control or predict the weather. When a cat washed its face, rain was supposed to follow; if it walked away from the fire, a storm was brewing. Caution and even discomfort was the typical reaction to cats, hence the common Irish greeting, “God bless all here except the cat.”
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Owl symbolic jewellery

Owl symbolic jewellery. Boucher vintage brooch Owl, crystals, enamel

Boucher vintage brooch Owl, crystals, enamel. Owl symbolic jewellery

Owl symbolic jewellery

The majestic power of the night-hunting owl was recognized by people around the world. To the Celts, the owl symbolized age and its attendant wisdom. Owls have a long history with humans. The relationship is probably not as close as that between humans and diurnal birds of prey, but, nevertheless, owls abound in myths, poems, paintings, and folklore. It is probably the owls’ almost human “face” that makes them so popular with many people. Today representations of owls, whether it is a painting, a sculpture, or a piece of jewellery are popular with collectors. However, owls are probably hated and feared in some cultures as much as they are liked and revered in others.
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Bird symbolic jewellery

Bird symbolic jewellery

Vintage brooch Blue Bird, marked GE WLIND. Bird symbolic jewellery

Bird symbolic jewellery
In most cultures, birds have always played major roles as symbols. A few of these include the sacred ibis of Egypt symbolized the moon god, Thoth, a deity of wisdom, apparently because its curved bill resembled the crescent moon. Cranes were symbolic of Apollo, the Greek god of the sun. The hoopoe plays a major role in the “The Conference of the Birds” in Islamic mysticism. Doves are well recognized as symbols of love and peace, and the Holy Spirit in Jude-Christian cultures is often symbolized as a dove. Birds are found as emblems or escorts of Celtic goddesses, especially the carrion-eaters, such as crows or ravens, that accompanied goddesses of war and death. Birds sometimes represented souls leaving the body, as their connection with warrior goddesses would suggest, but they also were seen as oracular. The designs formed by birds in flight were the basis of a now-lost system of divination.
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Comb and Hair symbolic jewellery

Fine hair combs of the first half of the XIX century

Fine hair combs of the first half of the XIX century. Comb and Hair symbolic jewellery

Comb and Hair symbolic jewellery is a symbolic object. The comb is associated with the mermaid, who was thought to sit on a rock combing her lovely hair, the better to lure sailors to their deaths. Invoking the principle of sympathetic magic—like attracting like Scottish girls were warned not to comb their hair in the evening when their brothers were at sea, because it might draw the energy of a dangerous mermaid to their ship. Combing one’s hair on a Wednesday would result in sterility, although the reason for this belief is unclear.
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Rare vintage Mourning jewellery

Vintage mourning jewellery

A part of mourning etiquette – Vintage mourning jewellery

Mourning jewellery is a part of mourning etiquette. In addition, such details, as a funeral inscription on the ring, or hair lock of a deceased, like a miniature gravestone, have become great storytellers and reveal many secrets of a bygone era.
However, the tradition of mourning ceremonial, including mourning dress and, in particular, mourning jewellery was originally a privilege of the royal courts of Europe from the Middle Ages. But from the 1840s, family-mourning dress became available in couture salons, or private dressmakers working at every social level. The vast array of products included widow’s weeds, indoor caps, fans, underwear, gloves, black-edged handkerchiefs, and a huge array of mourning jewelry, including black jet and “in memoriam” rings, brooches, and lockets.
All of them represented three styles for use – first, second, ordinary, and half mourning. Meanwhile, mourning etiquette contributed to the development of early forms of plastic used in imitation of jet jewelry, and finally, to the development of modern fashion.
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Salvador Dali surreal jewellery

The Living Flower. Salvador Dali surreal jewellery

The Living Flower. Salvador Dali surreal jewellery

Salvador Dali surreal jewellery

– What do you want my heart? What do you wish, my heart?
– The beating heart of the ruby!

Dialog of El Salvador and Gala

Masterpieces – like children. For their birthday are responsible two. She was the muse, he – the performer. He offered a brilliant implementation of each of her insane desires. She wanted to shine and luxury – he came up with jewelry. Jewellery Collection of Foundation “Gala – Salvador Dali” – a luxurious heritage of the genius. History of the jewelry collection of Salvador Dali begins in 1941. Dali drew sketches on paper, carefully working through all the details of the forms to the material and color, and then personally selected the materials and stones, and watched how a goldsmith Carlos Alemany embodies his idea of ​​gold.
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Flamingo inspired jewellery

The famous flamingo brooch by Cartier. 1940

Flamingo inspired jewellery. The famous flamingo brooch by Cartier. 1940

This flamingo brooch by Cartier was acquired by the Duke of Windsor just before the German occupation, designed by Jeanne Toussaint. The generous plot size of the brooch makes it exceptional for this period. After the sale of the Duchess of Windsor jewelry at auction Sotheby’s in Geneva in 1987, on the market appeared many copies of this brooch made of precious stones and crystals. Bird flamingo – a symbol of the fulfillment of your desires. Flamingo – beautiful and unusual bird because of its plumage. Some species of flamingos have bright plumage, resembling flames. That’s why it is called a fiery bird. Some flamingo have gentle pink color of feathers. Therefore they are called the bird of dawn. Pink color of Flamingo for most people represents a symbol of beauty and elegance.
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