Kaleidoscope effect

Jewellery kaleidoscope

Farm bird Apotropaic magic

18 Karat Gold, Platinum, Diamond and Ruby Rooster Brooch, Oscar Heyman & Brothers

Farm bird Apotropaic magic. 18 Karat Gold, Platinum, Diamond and Ruby Rooster Brooch, Oscar Heyman & Brothers

Farm bird Apotropaic magic.
Many birds were seen as being endowed with apotropaic magic. Ancient Greeks and Romans believed that the image of a chicken – amulet against the evil eye, as well as a chicken egg. Egg amulet is known in almost all cultures, stone eggs are found even in before-Neolithic graves. In Europe, as a talisman and amulet since ancient times were used the so-called bone desires – V-shaped chicken or turkey breast bone, both present in the form of pendants, and brooches, trinkets of gold and silver. A variety of necklaces, charms with golden ducks found in ancient Egypt, and later – in the Hellenistic and Eastern world. A pair of mandarin ducks “Yuan-yang” symbolized and also served as a talisman of conjugal life in China. Fluffy tail of the wild duck was attached to the earrings of Tajiks and Uzbeks, in addition, in Central Asia, Apotropaic magic had feathers and claws of birds, embodying fertility: dove, pheasant, rooster.

Farm bird Apotropaic magic

1950-60s Vintage Cockerel Damascene, marked Spain

In Celtic mythology, cock is a symbolic animal. Although domestic chickens were more utilitarian than religious, the cock or rooster drew some superstitions to itself. Possibly because of its harsh call, the cock was believed to protect against danger that might approach from an unanticipated direction; this power was especially strong in March. Black cocks were viewed as lucky, while white cocks were just the opposite.

Farm bird Apotropaic magic

Cockerel Figurine by American jewelry designer Jay Strongwater

Cock and the Pearl, The Aesopic fable

A cock was strutting up and down the farmyard among the hens when suddenly he saw something shining amid the straw. “Ho! ho!” he said.“That’s for me.” He soon rooted it out from beneath the straw. The shiny object turned out to be a pearl that by some chance had been lost in the yard. “You may be a treasure,” said Master Cock, “to men that prize you, but for me I would rather have a single barleycorn than a peck of pearls.” Moral: Precious things are for those who can prize them.

Farm bird Apotropaic magic

Decorative Sculpture ‘Cockerel’. 1995 EA Larichev from the village of Red. Krasnoselsky Jewelry Factory

Dueling roosters, 18k Gold, Platinum, Colored Stone, Enamel and Diamond Jabot

Dueling roosters, 18k Gold, Platinum, Colored Stone, Enamel and Diamond Jabot

If one looks up at the steeples of churches and cathedrals in Europe, the most common figure at the apex is that of a rooster. It was commonly believed in the past that the devil could carry out his evil work only under cover of darkness and had to retreat to his own realm at the first light of day. Roosters are thus charged with spotting the first light of the sun and crowing loudly to let the devil know that his time has expired while at the same time letting the people know that it is safe to venture out into the day.

Farm bird Apotropaic magic

Roosters, carved from Agalmatolite

Two gem set, enamel and diamond cockerel brooches, late 19th century

Two gem set, enamel and diamond cockerel brooches, late 19th century

Erwin Pearl vintage brooch Cockerel

Erwin Pearl vintage brooch Cockerel

Bright Brooch tropical bird

Bright Brooch ‘tropical bird’ from Avon, coated with yellow enamel and jewelry. 1970s

Brooch with a figure of a wild goose

Brooch with a figure of a wild goose, Tortolani, with cabochons ‘Beijing’ glass

Goose had mythological and symbolic significance to the Celts. The barnyard goose, a notoriously aggressive being, was seen as an image of the warrior divinities, both male and female. Stone geese lined the temples of Gaul, while Brittany produced bronzes of war goddesses with goose-head helmets.

Silver Brooch Pheasant

Silver Brooch ‘Emerald Pheasant’ by Reja, vintage 40s

Rare Collectible ornaments - Geese, silver brooches from the company Reja, book piece

Rare Collectible ornaments – Geese, silver brooches from the company Reja, book piece

The Ugly Duckling

The Ugly Duckling

Vintage brooch Bird of Happiness from Trifari

Vintage brooch Bird of Happiness from Trifari

Raymond Yard iconic designs of Rooster-waiter and a Rabbit. The first pieces of the collection were made in the late 1920

Raymond Yard iconic designs of Rooster-waiter and a Rabbit. The first pieces of the collection were made in the late 1920

Cockerel. Original South Sea Pearl Jewelry by Mario Buzzanca

Cockerel. Original South Sea Pearl Jewelry by Mario Buzzanca

Mamselle White & Black Enamel Gold tone Flying Bird Brooch

Mamselle White & Black Enamel Gold tone Flying Bird Brooch

Mamselle Rooster brooch in gold tone and rhinestone

Mamselle Rooster brooch in gold tone and rhinestone

Mamselle marked vintage enameled brooch Duck

Mamselle marked vintage enameled brooch Duck

Vintage Brooch bird in the nest

Vintage Brooch SWOBODA bird in the nest

Duckling. Lovely Brooch of Coro. Produced in the 1960s in the United States

Farm bird Apotropaic magic. Duckling. Lovely Brooch of Coro. Produced in the 1960s in the United States

Gold platinum ruby & diamond egret brooch

Farm bird Apotropaic magic. Gold platinum ruby & diamond egret brooch

Gold platinum emerald ruby & diamond duck brooch

Farm bird Apotropaic magic. Gold platinum emerald ruby & diamond duck brooch

18 Karat Gold, Platinum, Diamond and Ruby Rooster Brooch, Oscar Heyman & Brothers

Farm bird Apotropaic magic. 18 Karat Gold, Platinum, Diamond and Ruby Rooster Brooch, Oscar Heyman & Brothers

Art Nouveau jewellery by Lluis Masriera

Art Nouveau jewellery by Lluis Masriera

sources:
livemaster.ru
The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore, 2004